In A Vase On Monday—Gold Dust

In A Vase On Monday—Gold Dust

In A Vase On Monday—Gold Dust

As the week begins I join Cathy with In A Vase On Monday, an opportunity to share an arrangement using materials collected from the garden.

After some rain during the past week the garden perked up a little. The zinnias responded with fresh new flowers, even though powdery mildew is affecting the leaves. I planted Aucuba japonica ‘Variegata’ in Spring 2015 and it is coming along nicely. Its gold splotched leaves are the starting point for today’s arrangement, supported by orange and red zinnias.

The light was very low yesterday so I tried to photograph the arrangement in several places around the house.

In A Vase On Monday—Gold Dust

In A Vase On Monday—Gold Dust

 

Materials
Aucuba japonica ‘Variegata’ (Gold Dust Aucuba)
Zinnia ‘Cut and Come Again Mix’
Zinnia ‘Burpeeana Giants Mix’
Zinnia elegans ’Cactus Flower Blend’
Porcelain. Rectangle Ikebana Vase Blue Zen (6.75L x 3.75W x 2H)

In A Vase On Monday—Gold Dust

In A Vase On Monday—Gold Dust

I am behind lately in reading and commenting on garden blogs and hope to catch up soon. My head is swimming with ideas about gardening Friday and Saturday I attended a horticulture symposium at JC Raulston Arboretum which celebrated the garden’s 40th anniversary. The theme was “Horticultural Bright Lights: The Future of Gardening.” Here is a list of speakers.

Matthew Pottage – “Wisley—The New Chapter for the Flagship Garden of the Royal Horticultural Society”
Rebecca McMackin – “Brooklyn Bridge Park: Growing Biodiversity in the Concrete Jungle”
Hans Hansen – “New Plant Development at Walters Gardens”
Claudia West — “Planting in a Post-wild World”
Claudia West – Designing Plant Communities: The Art and Science of Successful Planting
Aaron Floden, Ph.D. – “Exploration, Discovery, and Bridging Botany and Horticulture”
Jared Barnes, Ph.D. – “Propagating Horticulturists: A Cultural Guide for Cultivating the Future of Horticulture”
Matt and Tim Nichols – “International Maples of Mystery”

As I told a friend this weekend, after hearing these inspiring talks I may not give up on my garden just yet.

Thanks to Cathy for hosting and giving us a chance to express our flower arranging passion. Visit her at Rambling In The Garden to discover what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday—Gold Dust

In A Vase On Monday—Gold Dust

 

 

In A Vase On Monday—In A Basket

In A Vase On Monday - In A Basket

In A Vase On Monday – In A Basket

As the week begins I join Cathy with In A Vase On Monday, an opportunity to share an arrangement using materials collected from the garden.

Sunday evening we had rain! Much needed, much appreciated rain. But Sunday afternoon I began today’s vase with the idea of creating a small design using bright multicolored flower clusters of Lantana camara.  Given the increasingly dry conditions in the garden for the last six or seven weeks it seemed unlikely much else would be available. But I noticed some Perovskia (Russian Sage) that looked fresh, similarly Verbena bonariensis, and surprisingly, even three Iceberg roses.

In A Vase On Monday

In A Vase On Monday – Lantana camara

I added a few zinnias and marigolds. Soon I had collected not armloads of flowers, but certainly more than expected. It felt bounteous.

Searching around for a container I thought of simply displaying the flowers informally in a basket. The idea stuck and I chose an egg basket I had woven many years ago.

Perovskia atriplicifolia (Russian Sage)

Perovskia atriplicifolia (Russian Sage)

Grouping them into bundles by flower type, I loosely inserted the colorful blooms into the basket, layering them to suggest they had been gathered that way. [I did not use water so after taking photographs, the flowers were unceremoniously placed in a ceramic vase where they should last for much of the week.

In A Vase On Monday

In A Vase On Monday

In A Vase On Monday - In A Basket

In A Vase On Monday – In A Basket

In A Vase On Monday - In A Basket

In A Vase On Monday – In A Basket

Materials
Chrysanthemum
Lantana camara (Common lantana)
Lathyrus latifolius (Perennial Sweet Pea)
Perovskia atriplicifolia (Russian Sage)
Rosa ‘Iceberg’
Tagetes (Marigold)
Verbena bonariensis (Tall Verbena)
Zinnia ‘Cut and Come Again Mix’
Zinnia ‘Burpeeana Giants Mix’
Zinnia elegans ’Cactus Flower Blend’
Twin-bottom egg basket, reed and wisteria

In A Vase On Monday - In A Basket

In A Vase On Monday – In A Basket

It is always such a pleasure to put together a weekly vase and especially I like the rich colors and the spontaneity of this Monday’s display. I took additional photos outdoors in the garden and have included some of them here. If you have time, click to enlarge these images and view as a slideshow.

Thanks to Cathy for hosting and giving us a chance to express our flower arranging passion. Visit her at Rambling In The Garden to discover what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday.

Recent Blooms As Summer Wanes

Reblooming Iris

Reblooming Iris August 27, 2016

It feels a bit strange, but welcome all the same, to see a bearded iris reblooming. This one is a pass-along and I do not know its name. This image is from August 27. The flowers lasted but a short time under the strong summer sun.

Reblooming Iris

Reblooming Iris August 27, 2016

There’s been essentially no rain for 6 weeks so the garden looks sad. A few blooms here and there lift my spirits, but can do only so much. I do have a few photographs of flowers taken over the last couple of weeks to record and document the waning days of Summer 2016. Today seems to be bloom day so the timing works well. Some of the pictures from September 2 have water droplets that disprove my memory, but the rain was brief, not the quenching, restorative kind.

Zinnia

Zinnia – September 2, 2016

Tradescantia (Spiderwort)

Tradescantia (Spiderwort) – September 2, 2016

Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ (Herbstfreude)

Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ (Herbstfreude) – September 2, 2016

Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ (Herbstfreude) (Stonecrop) September 15, 2016

Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ (Herbstfreude) (Stonecrop) September 15, 2016

Salvia greggii ‘Furman’s Red’ (Autumn Sage)

Salvia greggii ‘Furman’s Red’ (Autumn Sage) – September 2, 2016

Salvia greggii ‘Furman’s Red’ (Autumn Sage)

Salvia greggii ‘Furman’s Red’ (Autumn Sage) – September 2, 2016

Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower)

Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower) – September 2, 2016

Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower)

Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower) – September 2, 2016

Rudbeckia fulgida (Orange Coneflower)

Rudbeckia fulgida (Orange Coneflower) – September 2, 2016

Rudbeckia fulgida (Orange Coneflower)

Rudbeckia fulgida (Orange Coneflower) – September 2, 2016

Rudbeckia fulgida 'Goldsturm' (Black-eyed Susan)

Rudbeckia fulgida ‘Goldsturm’ (Black-eyed Susan) – September 2, 2016

Physostegia virginiana (Obedient Plant)

Physostegia virginiana (Obedient Plant) – September 2, 2016

Physostegia virginiana (Obedient Plant)

Physostegia virginiana (Obedient Plant) – September 2, 2016

Marigold

Marigold

Perovskia atriplicifolia (Russian Sage)

Perovskia atriplicifolia (Russian Sage)

Periwinkle (Vinca)

Periwinkle (Vinca) – September 2, 2016

Gardenia jasminoides

Gardenia jasminoides – September 2, 2016

Garden Phlox Phlox paniculata 'Nicky'

Garden Phlox Phlox paniculata ‘Nicky’ – September 2, 2016

Euphorbia 'Shorty' (Shorty Spurge)

Euphorbia ‘Shorty’ (Shorty Spurge) – September 2, 2016

Cleome hassleriana (Spider Flower)

Cleome hassleriana (Spider Flower) – September 2, 2016

Buddleja davidii ‘Adokeep’ (Adonis blue Butterfly Bush)

Buddleja davidii ‘Adokeep’ (Adonis blue Butterfly Bush) – September 2, 2016

Artemisia 'Powis Castle' (Wormwood)

Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ (Wormwood) – September 2, 2016

With apologies to anyone who is sensitive to spiders, this intrepid garden sentry has been a constant presence for several weeks. Just after I discovered it (and almost backed into it), the Yellow Garden spider relocated to its current location from the other side of the tree. It is also sometimes know as Writing Spider.

Argiope aurantia (Yellow Garden Spider)

Argiope aurantia (Yellow Garden Spider) -August 27, 2016

Argiope aurantia (Yellow Garden Spider)

Argiope aurantia (Yellow Garden Spider) – September 2, 2016

With the pressing heat the garden has not been tended for weeks. I made a quick stop this afternoon in search of Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon) to replace Angelonia, the stalwart of the meditation circle from June until frost.

I should have shopped at a better garden center but it is unlikely I will have time to get to one. At this store the available snapdragons were generically labelled and although I had hoped for white ones, the choices were either “unknown” (because no flowers had opened) or yellow or this multicolored one that I chose. It sports mixed flowers of red, pink, coral and yellow and should add some pep to the labyrinth.

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon) – September 15, 2016

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon) – September 15, 2016

 

 

 

More Beautyberry

On Monday I used branches of Callicarpa americana (American beautyberry) to form the main structure of a floral design. Several people commented about this callicarpa being different from ones grown in their gardens, so I thought I would share a few more photographs of this shrub, which is native to Southern United States. I took this sequence of images on September 2, 2016.

American beautyberry has a loose, open form. The flowers are said to be insignificant. Pink buds form along leaf axils.

Flower buds. Callicarpa americana (American beautyberry)

Flower buds. Callicarpa americana (American beautyberry) -September 2, 2016

Flowering continues up the stalk as fruit forms from the spent blossoms left behind.

Pink flowers give way to small berries. Callicarpa americana (American beautyberry)

Pink flowers give way to small berries. Callicarpa americana (American beautyberry)-September 2, 2016

The clusters of fruit hug the stem. As the green drupes ripen their color shifts to reddish-purple.

Clusters of ripening fruit. Callicarpa americana (American beautyberry)

Clusters of ripening fruit. Callicarpa americana (American beautyberry) -September 2, 2016

For use in a flower arrangement I had to pluck the leaves away. The leaves eventually will drop leaving the bright berries for cardinals and other birds to enjoy.

Callicarpa americana (American beautyberry)

Callicarpa americana (American beautyberry)-September 2, 2016

Callicarpa americana (American beautyberry)

Callicarpa americana (American beautyberry)-September 12, 2016

In A Vase On Monday—Beautyberry

In A Vase On Monday - Beautyberry

In A Vase On Monday – Beautyberry

Each Monday brings the chance to join Cathy’s In A Vase On Monday to share an arrangement using materials gathered from the garden.

I am late preparing today’s vase, but managed to assemble a quick contribution featuring maturing stems of Callicarpa americana (American Beautyberry), a shrub native to the southeastern United States. Here is the arrangement from a different side.

In A Vase On Monday - Beautyberry

In A Vase On Monday – Beautyberry

To pair with the purplish-magenta of the ripened callicarpa berries, I included  a large stalk of Phlox paniculata ‘Nicky.’

Phlox paniculata 'Nicky,' American Beautyberry, Marigold

Phlox paniculata ‘Nicky,’ American Beautyberry, Marigold

Multiple stems of light pink Physostegia virginiana (Obedient Plant) act as a foil to soften the brash hues, then a few bright yellow zinnias and French marigolds add more dashes of color.

In A Vase On Monday - Beautyberry

In A Vase On Monday – Beautyberry

Obedient Plant, American Beautyberry, Zinnia, Marigold

Obedient Plant, American Beautyberry, Zinnia, Marigold

Photographing the arrangement was relegated to the screened porch so we would not have to be picking up little berries all week.

In A Vase On Monday - Beautyberry

In A Vase On Monday – Beautyberry

To hold the heavy stems of berries in place I used the larger Perfect Arranger floral holder, which in turn was secured to the container with floral clay adhesive. If I had had more time I might have worried about hiding the mechanics, but I think the Perfect Arranger is interesting and does not detract.

In A Vase On Monday - Beautyberry

In A Vase On Monday – Beautyberry

Materials
Callicarpa americana (American Beautyberry)
Phlox paniculata ‘Nicky’ (tall garden phlox)
Physostegia virginiana (Obedient Plant)
Zinnia ‘Cut and Come Again Mix’
Zinnia ‘Burpeeana Giants Mix’
Zinnia elegans ‘Cactus Flower Blend’
Round shallow ceramic bowl
Perfect Arranger floral holder
Floral clay adhesive

In A Vase On Monday - Beautyberry

In A Vase On Monday – Beautyberry

In A Vase On Monday - Beautyberry

In A Vase On Monday – Beautyberry

In A Vase On Monday - Beautyberry

In A Vase On Monday – Beautyberry

Thanks to Cathy for hosting this weekly chance to express our flower arranging passion. Visit her at Rambling In The Garden to discover what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday—Tiny Pleasures

In A Vase On Monday - Tiny Pleasures

In A Vase On Monday – Tiny Pleasures

As the week begins it is fun to share an arrangement using materials gathered from the garden as part of Cathy’s In A Vase On Monday feature.

Unassuming, small bits of color gathered from here and there are the mainstay of this week’s garden offerings.

Phlox paniculata ‘Nicky’ was the first flower chosen for today and its short stem dictated creating a design composed of other tiny ones. The Jackmanii clematis ventured a couple of blooms after Hurricane Hermine brought much needed rain.  I fit the red Nicky phlox and a clematis into a clear espresso cup, filling in with several stems of Verbena bonariensis (which shed heavily) and a sprig of Perennial Sweet Pea.

Phlox paniculata 'Nicky' and Clematis 'Jackmanii'

Overhead View. Phlox paniculata ‘Nicky’ and Clematis ‘Jackmanii’

The rain this week also helped revive the zinnias and marigolds which had been suffering under the late August sun, reason enough to fill a second cup. A small sprig of lavender and several stems of asclepias made agreeable companions.

Asclepias Overhead View - Asclepias tuberosa, Zinnia, Marigold, Zinnia, Marigold

Asclepias Overhead View – Asclepias tuberosa, Zinnia, Marigold, Zinnia, Marigold

In A Vase On Monday - Tiny Pleasures

In A Vase On Monday – Tiny Pleasures

Materials
Asclepias tuberosa (Butterfly Plant)
Clematis ‘Jackmanii’
Lathyrus latifolius (Perennial Sweet Pea)
Lavandula x intermedia ‘Dutch’ (Dutch Lavender)
Marigold
Phlox paniculata ‘Nicky’ (tall garden phlox)
Verbena bonariensis (Tall Verbena)
Zinnia ‘Cut and Come Again Mix’ (Burpee, popular cutting variety, 24” H)
Zinnia ‘Burpeeana Giants Mix’ (Burpee, colorful huge 6’ Blooms, 24” H)
Zinnia elegans ‘Cactus Flower Blend’ (Botanical Interests, 4-6” wide, 2-3’H. Heirloom Twist and shout. Double and semi-double)
Riedel Espresso Crystal Cups/Saucers

In A Vase On Monday - Tiny Pleasures

In A Vase On Monday – Tiny Pleasures

Thanks to Cathy for hosting and giving us a chance to express our flower arranging passion. Visit her at Rambling In The Garden to discover what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday.