Garden Bloggers Foliage Day – December 2012

It is time to join Christina‘s Garden Bloggers Foliage Day (GBFD), a monthly tribute to foliage.

Euphorbia ‘Blackbird’ has been a rewarding addition to the garden this year and GBFD would not be complete without including it. The tips have deepened to a captivating, velvety red.

Euphorbia 'Blackbird' (Spurge)

Euphorbia ‘Blackbird’ (Spurge)

Euphorbia 'Blackbird' (Spurge)

Euphorbia ‘Blackbird’ (Spurge)

The leaves of this Wintergreen boxwood have taken on a bronze hue for winter.

Buxus microphylla var koreana 'Wintergreen' (Wintergreen boxwood)

Buxus microphylla var koreana ‘Wintergreen’ (Wintergreen boxwood)

This bronzing effect is a normal coloration change for this shrub, but it seems more noticeable this year.

Buxus microphylla var koreana 'Wintergreen' (Wintergreen boxwood)-Detail

Buxus microphylla var koreana ‘Wintergreen’ (Wintergreen boxwood)-Detail

The bluish-gray leaves of Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ (Wormwood) are unaffected so far by the cold.

Artemisia 'Powis Castle' (Wormwood)

Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ (Wormwood)

This Ilex crenatea ‘Drops of Gold’ (Japanese Holly) was planted in front of the house in October. It lost some of its gold leaves from the stem tips a few weeks ago, but the plant seems to have stabilized now. It formed attractive, black berries, but only a few.

Ilex crenatea 'Drops of Gold' (Japanese Holly)

Ilex crenatea ‘Drops of Gold’ (Japanese Holly)

Mounds of Lychnis coronaria (Rose Campion) catch late afternoon sunlight along the Southern side path.

Lychnis coronaria (Rose Campion)

Lychnis coronaria (Rose Campion)

A pot of mixed sedum adds texture and interest to a corner just inside the garden gate.

Mixed Sedum

Mixed Sedum

Fern-like leaves of Tanacetum vulgare (Tansy) offer surprisingly fresh greenery to the southwest corner.

Tanacetum vulgare (Tansy)

Tanacetum vulgare (Tansy)

Daffodils already are sending up leaves beneath the brittle canes of Lantana camara (Common lantana). The lantana will be pruned back hard in early spring.

Daffodil

Daffodil

This cheerful little mound of green is Iberis Sempervirens. Although Iberis died out in the meditation circle this summer, it is growing in several other spots around the garden. This one may be blooming soon.

Iberis Sempervirens (Candytuft)

This potted geranium’s leaf is punctuated with tangerine edges and strongly outlined veins.

Pelargonium (Geranium)

Pelargonium (Geranium)

Thanks to Christina of Creating My Own Garden of the Hesperides for hosting Garden Bloggers Foliage Day (GBFD) each month. Check out her foliage observations and those of other GBFD participants.

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11 thoughts on “Garden Bloggers Foliage Day – December 2012

  1. paulinemulligan

    You have such a lot of beautiful foliage still and so colourful too! Winter certainly makes us appreciate all the foliage in the garden when there aren’t many flowers to distract us. Happy Christmas to you and your family!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Pauline. Winter has revealed many opportunities for improving my garden, including concentrating more on how the foliage of different plants can work together. Something to think about for the new year. Merry Christmas and peace to you.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      The Euphorbia looks Christmasy, doesn’t it? It would be nice to have a mass planting of some of these plants that have showy foliage, but for now it’s really just one plant here and one plant there.

      Reply
  2. greenbenchramblings

    What a great selection of plants. I particularly like the light playing on the Powis Castle. (Powis Castle by the way is just half an hour down the road from us so will appear in my blog one of these days)

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I must admit I only in the last couple months realized there even is a Powis Castle. I do look forward to a guided tour through your blog. Peace. Susie

      Reply
  3. Christina

    Thank you for joining in again this month Susie. I am envious of the Euphorbia; many other types grow so easily for me but ‘Blackbird’ refuses to thrive. Have a wonderful Christmas, Christina

    Reply
  4. Alberto

    Wow! Nice pictures! I like that box, especially planted in that blue pot, it looks perfect! And I am soooooooo envious of your euphorbia, I can’t grow large spurge in this garden successfully and I still haven’t understand why!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Alberto! Blue pots are good. Euphorbia is new to me this year and it has done fine living in a big pot. Wish I had put it in the ground though.

      Reply

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