Celebrating Spring

Duke Gardens

Duke Gardens

To celebrate the first day of Spring yesterday, we went headed to nearby Durham. First we viewed a photography exhibit at the Nasher Museum of Art on the Duke campus and enjoyed lunch at the museum cafe. Next we went to see early spring flowers in the Italianate-styled terraces of the Sarah P. Duke Gardens.

The beds here are planted with annuals and bulbs. Last year when we visited these gardens the tulips were just past their prime and this year we were early. Still there were many pleasures to behold whether looking close-up at the plants or taking in the long views.

Duke Gardens

Duke Gardens

Duke Gardens

Duke Gardens

Duke Gardens

Duke Gardens

The day was partly cloudy and I felt a bit cool, that is until we met a woman from Indiana who told us she had left home the previous day in 9°F. weather. She and her daughter were wondering the name of these eye-catching blooms. I had admired this plant earlier and was able to identify it as Anemone (Anemone coronaria ‘Lord Lieutenant’).

Anemone coronaria 'Lord Lieutenant'

Anemone coronaria ‘Lord Lieutenant’

Anemone coronaria 'Lord Lieutenant'

Anemone coronaria ‘Lord Lieutenant’

Anemone ‘Rosea’ (Windflower) was also striking.

Anemone 'Rosea' (Windflower)-Duke Gardens

Anemone ‘Rosea’ (Windflower)-Duke Gardens

Anemone 'Rosea' (Windflower)-Duke Gardens

Anemone ‘Rosea’ (Windflower)-Duke Gardens

At the bottom of the terraces is the fish pond, a favorite spot of small children and and grown-ups alike. To the right of the pond was a wonderful Witch-hazel.

Working our way back up the terraces, one planting I particularly admired was this mix of daffodils and orange tulips.

Tulips and Daffoidls-Duke Gardens

Tulips and Daffoidls-Duke Gardens

Daffodil-Duke Gardens

Daffodil-Duke Gardens

Tulip-Duke Gardens

Tulip-Duke Gardens

There were many Erysimum (Wallflowers) interspersed with tulips in the beds. Since most tulips were not open we will have to return to see the full effect. One combination of Erysimum with a salmon-pink Hyacinth was lovely.

Erysimum 'Jenny Brook' (Wallflower)-Duke Gardens

Erysimum ‘Jenny Brook’ (Wallflower)-Duke Gardens

Wallflower and Hyacinth-Duke Gardens

Wallflower and Hyacinth-Duke Gardens

Hyacinth-Duke Gardens

Hyacinth-Duke Gardens

Sweet William is an old-fashioned flower that I just love.

Sweet William and Tulip-Duke Gardens

Sweet William and Tulip-Duke Gardens

These were pretty flowers but I must have been distracted before locating the plant label. Anyone know what they are? [Update: Thanks to both Cathy and Malc for the quick ID of these. This is Bellis perennis, a perennial lawn daisy.]

Duke Gardens

Duke Gardens

Duke Gardens

Duke Gardens

I imagine it might be April before the Wisteria Pergoda at the top of the terraces blooms. Another reason to visit this garden again.

Wisteria-covered Pergola-Duke Gardens

Wisteria-covered Pergola-Duke Gardens

Our spring celebration continued last night at North Carolina Botanical Garden Director Peter White’s presentation of the natural history of Robert Frost’s poetry. Robert Frost visited Chapel Hill for many years to give readings in celebration of spring and walked the woods here. His knowledge of plants is evident in his poetry as White illustrated during his talk.

Advertisements

13 thoughts on “Celebrating Spring

  1. Cathy

    How lovely – spring flowers and poetry in one day! The anemones are gorgeous. The unknown plants are perhaps what we call Bellis (daisies?). They are sold for spring bedding here, as they don’t like our cold winter. They look lovely all together in a group. 😀

    Reply
  2. missinghenrymitchell

    What a gift it is to have Duke Gardens in our backyard. I love the Bellis but have never had much luck with them, despite more than a few tries. They’re so enchanting; I may have to attempt them again. I must get over to campus soon before the season fully changes–I need to find some winter inspiration, and Duke Gardens has it in abundance. And yes, the wisteria will be out in late April to early May–I remember it in conjunction with graduation. Maybe I’ll see you there. 🙂

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Hi, I wasn’t sure exactly where you’re located. I’m in Chapel Hill and do indeed feel fortunate to have some significant public gardens nearby. Hope we can meet up someday. Susie

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s