Studying The Borders At May’s End

Lychnis coronaria (Rose Campion) - Looking Toward Northern Border

Lychnis coronaria (Rose Campion) – Looking Toward Northern Border

May was cool and wet.  May was sunny with remarkably blue skies and low humidity. May was dry. May was humid.  May, on its last day, was 90°F.

Rarely do I water the garden, but I made an exception today. After such generous rains for the last few months, the past couple of weeks without showers has shocked the plants. The extended cool spring finally has given way to warming and it has begun to feel like summer is on the way.

Irises dominated the May landscape, but a shift occurred in the last ten days and the garden seems brand new. Border are full, colors are stronger, but green predominates from afar.

Garden View Toward Southern Border

Garden View Toward Southern Border

Garden View-Looking Toward Southwest Corner

Garden View-Looking Toward Southwest Corner

Garden View-Looking Toward Southwest Corner

Garden View-Looking Toward Southwest Corner

Gardern View Looking toward Northern Border

Gardern View Looking toward Northern Border

Southern Border

Lychnis coronaria (Rose Campion) anchors each end of the Southern border. The five Juniperus scopulorum ‘Wichita Blue’ have grown well above the fence in the past couple of years since they was planted. One day they may really function as a privacy hedge.

Lychnis coronaria (Rose Campion) - Looking Southeast

Lychnis coronaria (Rose Campion) – Looking Southeast

In front of the junipers, a pass-along perennial sweet pea began flowering this week. I sheared it back severely this year and the result is much tidier.

Perennial Everlasting Sweet Pea

Perennial Everlasting Sweet Pea

Three native Rudbeckia fulgida (Orange Coneflower) that were added to the southwest corner of the garden last year seem to have settled in well and look very healthy.

Rudbeckia fulgida (Orange Coneflower) and Heuchera villosa 'Big Top Bronze' (Coral Bells)

Rudbeckia fulgida (Orange Coneflower) and Heuchera villosa ‘Big Top Bronze’ (Coral Bells)

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8 thoughts on “Studying The Borders At May’s End

    1. pbmgarden Post author

      My dear garden mentor first gave me Lychnis and I feel the garden really needs to always have some. The Heuchera colors shift in the light for a nice effect. Thanks for your comments.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Some of the new varieties are supposed to be able to withstand sun. This heuchera is labeled for full-sun but I moved it into part-shade this year and it is much happier.

      Reply

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