Color In The June Borders

During a brief stroll through the garden this afternoon I was struck by the strong colors, including greens, dominating each of the borders.

Fragrance is important too and as I approached the western border to inspect the new blooms on the butterfly bush the delectable scent of nearby gardenia was quite magnificent, powerful enough in fact to overcome the Buddleia’s rather peculiar smell. The color of this Buddleia is actually a bit less blue and more purple than it appears in this image.

Buddleia davidii ‘Adokeep’ (Butterfly Bush)

Buddleia davidii ‘Adokeep’ (Butterfly Bush)

Echinacea is filling out many of the borders currently. The colors range from the pale pink to a deep almost raspberry. My would-be favorite-colored echinacea, the orange Big Sky Sundown, never lasts a season in my garden, so I am resigned to enjoying them in the pink ranges for now.

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

Hummingbirds and butterflies are enjoying the drifts of bright scarlet Monarda and indoors these flowers last for many days.

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower) and Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm)

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower) and Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm)

Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm)

Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm) Creative Commons License
Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm) by Patricia Moffat, pbmGarden is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

A large grouping of Shasta Daisy near the back steps is bright and cheerful. These flowers seems to require a lot of water, which I very seldom dole out to any plants in the garden after the first few weeks. After a mostly cloudy day it is raining here this evening, so everything is getting a nice drink.

Leucanthemum x superbum (Shasta Daisy)

Leucanthemum x superbum (Shasta Daisy)

Leucanthemum x superbum (Shasta Daisy)

Leucanthemum x superbum (Shasta Daisy)

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17 thoughts on “Color In The June Borders

  1. missinghenrymitchell

    Yes, it looks wonderful! My Monarda and Echinacea are close to blooming. My gardenias have exploded. I have some Shasta daisies, too, but I just transplanted them from a large, over-crowded container and I think they may take their time settling in.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Good luck with your Shasta daisies. These have asserted themselves and taken over more space than I would prefer, but for a short while (before needing deadheading) they do earn their keep. We seem to grow many of the same plants. Your gardenia looks lovely. Susie

      Reply
  2. Cathy

    Lovely flowers everywhere Susie. It’s a nice reminder when I look at your photos of things to come in July here! I had a small buddleia a few years ago, and was quite relieved when it died one winter – it had a very sickly sweet scent, accentuated in the afternoon heat! I usually love buddleias, so the fragrance must depend on the type.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      That’s funny Cathy. I wouldn’t really miss this one much if it were gone. The flowers are supposed to do well indoors but I can’t take the scent. Susie

      Reply
  3. Pauline

    Your drift of Monada is wonderful, it makes me wonder why I have never grown them! I like your Buddleja Adokeep, do the butterflies like it as much as the others, I like the way the flowers are made up of separate pom-poms.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Monarda is nice to grow. The leaves get mildewy in our humid summer heat, but they require very little care. The butterflies were drawn to it last year Pauline, but this year I’m not seeing many very butterflies yet on anything. (I’m 95% sure this is Adokeep.)

      Reply
  4. Alberto

    Susie, thank god you wrote that buddleja is not as blue as it seems because I was already burning with envy! Never seen a buddleja that blue indeed, but the for of the panicle and the anyway blue tinge of the flowers make it a beautiful specimen!
    I love your monarda too, I have a couple of plants that aren’t very happy in my gravel garden, I guess they need more water and more space/air since they alway have mildew.
    I didn’t know shasta daisies need a lot of water, I know they are rather common garden plants but I love them and I was thinking of adding some to my garden, no you have me rethinking it…

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I’ll try to post another photo of the buddleja when it’s not in so much shade. It does have a nice strong color and form.
      My monarda has a lot of mildew every year in that location, but I hate to thin it out and give up some of the blooms.
      My Shastas face west in full sun, so they seem to appreciate the rain. I don’t water them so some years they don’t last as well, but they’re very reliable.

      Reply

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