Garden Recordkeeping Part 5

As September 2013 winds down I have some photographs and notes to record. This is the fifth and final post in this series.

The Southern side path leads from the left front of the house toward the garden in the back. Muhlenbergia capillaris (Pink Muhly Grass) is blooming there currently. It sits at the bottom end of the path, just before the walk turns right to guide visitors through the white picket gate entrance.

Muhlenbergia capillaris (Pink Muhly Grass) in Southern Side Path

Muhlenbergia capillaris (Pink Muhly Grass) in Southern Side Path

Other plants featured at this time in the Southern side garden are Perovskia atriplicifolia (Russian Sage), Lavender, Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ (Wormwood), Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue.’

Perovskia atriplicifolia (Russian Sage)

Perovskia atriplicifolia (Russian Sage)

An Iceberg rose belonged to a dear friend and though I am not much a a rose grower, this one is special for sentimental reasons. Since the weather cooled it has been reblooming.

Rosa 'Iceberg'

Rosa ‘Iceberg’

Rosa 'Iceberg'

Rosa ‘Iceberg’

Rosa 'Iceberg'

Rosa ‘Iceberg’

Rosa 'Iceberg'

Rosa ‘Iceberg’

I keep trying Verbena bonariensis (Tall Verbena) in various spots around the garden. American Goldfinches love the seeds and look pretty against whatever remaining lavender flowers have not gone to seed.

Verbena bonariensis (Tall Verbena)

Verbena bonariensis (Tall Verbena)

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower) is reliable and that is reason enough to like it. Although it is always listed as drought-resistant, it really did a lot better than usual when we were having plenty of rain.

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

Last year I planted a row of three Italian Cypresses in back along the Northern border. Most of the time since, they have not looked quite convinced they should live and thrive, but do seem to be growing now a bit. Cornus florida (Flowering Dogwood) is planted nearby.

Italian Cypress and Cornus florida (Flowering Dogwood)

Italian Cypress and Cornus florida (Flowering Dogwood)

Self-seeded Zinnias are still blooming in the northeast corner of the garden, as well as in a border near the back steps. These are the giant variety so they add some much needed height to the garden. I have not seen any butterflies around them lately, but earlier they attracted many Eastern Tiger Swallowtails.

Zinnia

Zinnia

Almanac
Partly cloudily, 66.6°F. at 7:25 pm, heading toward low tonight of 54°F. Warmer days for the rest of the week. No rain forecast. Waning crescent moon.

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15 thoughts on “Garden Recordkeeping Part 5

  1. Cathy

    A very pretty white rose Susie. Does your Verbena bonariensis spread? Mine only ever sows itself in the most inappropriate places, like the middle of a path! It’s hard to keep it going and I usually buy a new plant or two in spring.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Cathy, I usually buy another one in the spring too as it doesn’t spread very quickly. You’re right though–when it spreads it goes into the path for me also! Do you cut yours back to keep it blooming? I hate to deprive the goldfinches. They sit on the slender stalks and look so happy eating the seeds.

      Reply
      1. Cathy

        I only cut it back if it looks really frazzled in the summer, but try and leave it standing in the autumn for as long as possible so that it sows itself out. I have never seen birds on it though.

  2. Christina

    I have just been given a Muhlenbergia capillaris, I’d never heard of it before and now you feature it, perfect, now I can ask you what conditions it really needs. Does it need a lot of extra irrigation, the colour of the flowers looks lovely, I’m planning to plant mine today.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Christina I think you’ll love the pink muhly. It just needs a sunny spot, water to get it established, it is droght-tolerant after that. Cut it back late winter. I just have the one, but it looks fabulous planted in a row or group. Now there is a white version and there is a planting in town that uses them together. Enjoy! Oh, and here is a link to Fairegarden’s pink muhly.

      Reply
  3. Stepheny Houghtlin

    Once again, enjoyed this particular series of #5 entries chronicling the winding down of the 2013 garden season. Lucky for those of us who live in NC, the season starts early and ends late. This garden, cared for by a passionate gardener, continues to grow and change as the gardener does too. I have had the pleasure of seeing this garden. These posts are great teachers. I recommend you share this information with others who might not be following this blog. A work in progress cared for by a knowledgeable gardener. Wouldn’t you love to be a neighbor that can look over the picket fence and take it all in.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      We are fortunate indeed to have such a long gardening season here. I’m pleased and honored you take time to read the goings-on in my garden. Thanks so much, S.

      Reply
  4. bittster

    My pink muhly is just starting, but we’re expecting the first frost in a week or two so it’s always a short lived show.
    The verbena self seeds very well for me. Any spot of bare earth seems to sprout its own crop of seedlings. Only mulched areas escape (another good reason to use mulch!)

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Hope your muhly gets a fair chance at blooming before frost. I love that verbena but mine has never looked as nice as that the first time I saw it (in a parking lot)!

      Reply

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