November’s Arrival

The temperature is a mild 70°F as November steps in to replace October. Several attempts to wander in the garden today were interrupted by sprinkles. After a few false starts one wonders if the forecast light rain will materialize at all—it is much needed.

The Euphorbia ‘Blackbird’ (Spurge) which was cut back last month now displays rich and colorful foliage.

Euphorbia 'Blackbird' (Spurge)

Euphorbia ‘Blackbird’ (Spurge)

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower) withstood last week’s first frost. Here it is cheerful in combination with Lavender.

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower) with Lavender

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower) with Lavender

The Chrysanthemums change color as they open from yellow buds to white. Later they take on a pinkish tinge.

Chrysanthemum

Chrysanthemum

Along the back steps Salvia Dorada ‘Aurea’ (Golden Sage) has grown up through the railing. It has overwintered for several years.

Salvia Dorada 'Aurea' (Golden Sage)

Salvia Dorada ‘Aurea’ (Golden Sage)

This view of the Meditation Circle and surrounds shows how so much of the planting have retreated for this gardening season.

Garden View With Meditation Circle

Garden View With Meditation Circle

I could not fit in the flower arranging classes this year, but even dropping a few garden materials in a handmade pot can be cheery.

Fall Arrangement

Fall Arrangement

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22 thoughts on “November’s Arrival

  1. Cathy

    Those coneflowers are amazing. Do they always flower for so long? I love the look of the meditation circle in this season – calm and peaceful!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Cathy! The meditation circle has pepped up tonight after some rain finally came today. I think the pansies added some much needed color. Last year the coneflowers were still going in mid-November. How nice it would be if that happens again!

      Reply
  2. Pauline

    I must try cutting Euphorbia Blackbird back when it looks past its best, I’ve never had the courage to do that before. Your Echinacea are flowering for such a long time, I think yours started before ours and are carrying on for much longer.- fantastic!

    Reply
  3. Marian St.Clair

    Euphorbia is a favorite, as it likes my shady garden while so many others don’t. I’ll be on the lookout for Blackbird, which has somehow excaped my notice.

    Your garden looks super. After the long growing season, I’m ready for the “spare” look.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Kevin. The meditation circle has been nice for meditation walks and nice to have another place to garden. The mums were pass-alongs so are special.

      Reply
  4. bittster

    I’m also a fan of the euphorbia, and I can see the pansies starting to fill in…. what a great fall planting!
    I never notice the fencing during the summer. Your plantings have done a good job of blending it in…. and the beauty berry stems look great in the arrangement.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks so much for your nice comments. The white fencing is the only kind allowed by our neighborhood. It solved some problems but can really glare on a hot summer day and I’m gradually getting things in place to hide it.

      Reply
  5. fredgonsowskigardenhome

    Hi there Pbmgarden,
    Today I worked outside digging out all the tender bulbs and tubers. When digging the canna, I though of you. I remember you saying on one of my posts, that you can leave yours in the ground where you live. Just having mine in the ground since May first of this year, they multiplied into great big clumps, Some of them I had to just cut through, not caring if I severed the roots. The three plants I started with two years ago, have produced two bushel baskets of tubers for next years planting and PUSHING off onto gardening friends. I could not imagine how big and hard to dig up, the clumps would be if I left them in the ground for two or three years. When ever you do decide to divide, be Mercy-less, and just divide and chop the pieces up, I don’t think you can really kill a canna, they are like a daylily or hosta in a way.
    Happy Fall!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Hi Fred, thanks for the note about Canna. Mine have not bloomed much for the last two years and I think they need the tough love treatment you describe–be merciless. But as you say they are very hard to dig up. Hope you have a happy fall also! Susie

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Oh, Donna! It was 60s here today and I was a bit chilled! Not ready for 30s, 40s but I guess you expect it where you live, even if you’re not ready for it. Finally it does seem like autumn here. Glad you like the echinacea. It’s still going strong today and I was able to share a stem of it with a friend, along with some chrysanthemums. Susie

      Reply
  6. Charlie@Seattle Trekker

    I always really enjoy seeing your garden and watching it change over time, thank you for sharing that. The Euphorbia ‘Blackbird’ (Spurge), that was new for me, it is such a gorgeous plant. I read the garden blogs for new ideas and that is a keeper. I am off to the internet to investigate that further.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Hi Charlie. I appreciate your comments. The garden has definitely transformed itself and is tucking down, preparing for winter rest. I saw Euphorbia used in many gardens on several garden tours in the last several years and it sparked my interest. Euphorbia happened to be the variety my garden center had. I’ve been extremely pleased with it and imagine it would do well in your location.

      Reply

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