Flowers And Other November Ephemera

Today there was a very early morning light rain, followed by fog—a mostly gray, dreary but mild day. The clouds lifted a short time before sunset and the sky colored a bright clear blue, before mixing with apricot, red and orange hues.

A few minutes earlier I went out to inspect the Irises–the ones that have been reblooming for several weeks. As welcome as they are I do find it unsettling to see Irises (and many neighbors’ Azaleas) flowering at this time of year.  This is an unknown cultivar passed-along by a friend. The bud is lavender but opens to white. [Note: November 9, 2013. Thanks to P&B at Petals and Wings for identifying this Iris in her comment below as ‘Immortality’ –the only reblooming white Iris.]

Reblooming Iris germanica (Bearded iris)

Reblooming Iris germanica (Bearded iris)

Iris germanica (Bearded iris)--the bud is lavender color

Iris germanica (Bearded iris)–the bud is lavender color

Iris germanica (Bearded iris)

Iris germanica (Bearded iris)

In September I had expected the Jackmanii Clematis to flower again but it did not. Today I found one perfect flower under the shelter of neighboring Muhlenbergia capillaris (Pink Muhly Grass).  This Clematis has interesting seed heads also.

Clematis 'Jackmanii'

Clematis ‘Jackmanii’

Clematis 'Jackmanii' seed head

Clematis ‘Jackmanii’ seed head

Surprisingly the Ginger Lily still has several blooms even after the October frost. The leaves and stalks are turning brown.

Hedychium coronarium (Ginger lily)

Hedychium coronarium (Ginger lily)

A nice surprise during this garden wander was finding that rich orange hips have formed on Gardenia jasminoides ‘Chuck Hayes’ along the western border.

Gardenia Hips -Gardenia jasminoides 'Chuck Hayes'

Gardenia Hips -Gardenia jasminoides ‘Chuck Hayes’

Gardenia Hips -Gardenia jasminoides 'Chuck Hayes'

Gardenia Hips -Gardenia jasminoides ‘Chuck Hayes’

Gardenia Hips -Gardenia jasminoides 'Chuck Hayes'

Gardenia Hips -Gardenia jasminoides ‘Chuck Hayes’

Gardenia Hips -Gardenia jasminoides 'Chuck Hayes'

Gardenia Hips -Gardenia jasminoides ‘Chuck Hayes’

The sasanquas this year are as pretty as they have ever been. The red one is Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’ but the name of the delicate pink and white one is unknown. They have grown up into each other over the years. The pink one was supposed to bloom in autumn and the Yuletide was to wait until winter, but obviously there can be a lot of variation. [Note: November 21, 2013-Thanks to Christina H. in Raleigh who identified the pink and white Camellia as ‘Hana-Jiman.’]

Camellia sasanqua

Camellia sasanqua

Camellia sasanqua

Camellia sasanqua

Camellia sasanqua

Camellia sasanqua

Camellia sasanqua

Camellia sasanqua

One last image for today is that of the Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’ I planted in April. This is a dwarf variety and maybe has managed to reach about 12 inches. It was touted as having nice fall foliage and it is beginning to display red stems and burgundy tinges on the leaves.

Hydrangea quercifolia 'Ruby Slippers'

Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’

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31 thoughts on “Flowers And Other November Ephemera

    1. pbmgarden Post author

      We seem to have lots of plants in common Michael. This oak leaf hydrangea is very sheltered so maybe that has made it change more slowly. It’s new this year.

      Reply
  1. P&B

    I think your lovely iris is called ‘Immortality’. From my limited knowledge of iris, it is the only white re-blooming iris. Your camellias are so beautiful and they seem to bloom forever. Is it easy to grow?

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      P&B, once again you’ve come through helping me with identification–really appreciate knowing the name of that iris. Glad you like the camellias. They are maintenance free once established, have a long bloom time and in this area, if you plant different varieties you can have them blooming most of the year. I hope to add some more.

      Reply
      1. pbmgarden Post author

        They are probably not cold-hardy in your area, but I know you are used to overwintering tender plants. Check out Camellia Forest Nursery–http://www.camforest.com

    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Hi Cindy. Years ago, the first time I found the (more orangey) gardenia hips, there were not many and they were on a different kind of gardenia. I thought the plant was diseased! This year the Chuck Hayes variety has numerous hips. The gardenias on which I had first seen hips do not (so far) have any.

      Reply
  2. Pauline

    The hips on your gardenia are stunning, such a lovely shape too. You have a lovely selection of flowers out now with your re- blooming iris and camellias, they must make your garden very spring like!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Marian, hope you find some! I have an unknown type of gardenia also and it has had hips previously but not so far this year. They’re more plentiful on the Chuck Hayes this year than I’ve ever seen.

      Reply
  3. Christina

    I have never seen Gardenia Hips before, they are beautiful, such an interesting form. As to your Iris – I can only say I wish mine were reflowering, yours are soooooooooooo beautiful.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      The Gardenia hips are a real treat. Perfect color for fall. I know we share an admiration for Irises. A reader (P&B) says she thinks this is called ‘Immortality’ –the only reblooming white Iris.

      Reply
  4. Cathy

    I can see from the comments that I’m not the only one stunned by those gorgeous gardenia hips! And the camellias are looking so good already – lovely!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Glad you like the gardenia hips Cathy! They are a bit unexpected, which is nice to encounter this time of year. The camellias require so little but bring a lot of pleasure. Enjoy your weekend.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Glad you enjoyed the flowers and foliage. We had frost yesterday morning but today it’s 74 degrees. So we are getting a taste of the cold weather. The irises didn’t like the frost but some buds still may open.

      Reply
  5. bittster

    Love the camellias and add me to the list of people fascinated by the gardenia hips….. very cool. Hope everything is still holding up well after the last cold snap.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Carolyn! Yuletide is one of those special plants I remember from childhood–always a blossom or two floating in a shallow glass dish at Thanksgiving. Susie

      Reply
  6. Annette

    The other day when I visited my nursery this pretty Camellia sasanqua Versicolor stood there looking up at me. Had to bring it home…destiny that is! 😉

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      You had no choice but to bring it home! Wonderful. Thanks for letting me know. I looked up ‘Versicolor’ and it is lovely. Hope you will get much pleasure from it Annette.

      Reply
      1. Annette

        It’s in the greenhouse at present but I shall plant it out in spring. Checking for flowers every day and will bring it onto our terrace when the cold spell is over. 🙂

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