An Aquilegia Moment

Native to eastern North America Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine) has been blooming in my garden since April 9. This is about the same time we noticed the spring’s first hummingbird visitor.

Recently I was reading on the black bench facing the meditation circle when a hummingbird came near. From my ring-side seat I watched it sip from one, two, three, four of the nodding red and yellow flowers.

In an instant the tiny bird was on its way, but the moment lingers still.

Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine) and Tradescantia (Spiderwort)

Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine) and Tradescantia (Spiderwort)

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23 thoughts on “An Aquilegia Moment

    1. pbmgarden Post author

      It certainly was wonderful Pauline. I need to spend a few more minutes like that more often, just relaxing in the garden. Who knows what I might see.

      Reply
  1. Chloris

    How wonderful to have humming birds in your garden, and what a gorgeous Aquilegia. We should all take more time to sit and enjoy are gardens.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      We used to hang hummingbird feeders years ago but since moving here I just let the flowers do the work. A big stand of Monarda is about to flower–that should keep the hummingbirds happy for a bit. It’s hard for gardeners to sit very long without seeing something that needs doing.

      Reply
  2. Marian St.Clair

    Such a beauty! Since I don’t have many blooms in my shady garden, I’ve recently added a hummingbird feeder. It’s nice to see the tiny birds come and go, but they dart around so fast I can’t keep my eye on them.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      They’re amazingly fast aren’t they? They make that distinctive sound when they come to the feeder–can hear them before you see them.

      Reply
  3. Julie

    This is a wonderful moment to recall, we do not have Hummingbirds here in the UK, they must be a fabulous sight even as quick as they are and I really like your Aquilegia too, it looks lovely en masse.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Julie. Sorry for the late reply. Your comment ended up marked as spam for some odd reason. I never tire of seeing the hummingbirds. I adore the columbine, but now it is well past time to trim it back. It spreads around the garden so easily. susie

      Reply
  4. Cathy

    How lovely to have seen that and simply enjoyed the moment. 😀 Those flowers are gorgeous… I finally found one for my own garden which will be featured in my next post!

    Reply
  5. Julie

    It sounds magical to be so close to a hummingbird. The closest we have here in the UK is the hummingbird moth, which is surprisingly similar – you have to take a careful look to realise that it is an insect and not a small bird escaped from the zoo.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Just found your comment in my spam Julie. Not sure what happened there, but thanks for your comment. The whir of the wings is easy to recognize and they are magical little creatures. Occasionally I have seen hummingbird moths around my lantana. Those are very cool. Susie

      Reply
  6. Pingback: A Gardener’s Paradise in Freising | Words and Herbs

    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Cathy, thanks for linking to my post. What a wonderful day you had selecting new plants–your excitement is palpable and makes me want to head to garden centers right away. Hope you’ll enjoy Aquilegia canadensis. Epimedium is something I would like to try growing. You made a lot a nice purchases–it will be fun to see them grow up. susie

      Reply
  7. bittster

    Those look great! For some reason I’ve always looked down on the native columbines but I think you’ve changed my mind! I came across a few out of bloom in the woods, and I think I’ll try and swing by the spot this summer and see if I can find a few ripe seeds… come to think of it I should swing by there next week or so to see if they’re in bloom yet.

    Reply

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