Sunday Morning Promenade — Part 1

Iris germanica (Bearded iris)  (bearded German Iris)

Iris germanica (Bearded iris) (bearded German Iris)

The forecast which called for rain by afternoon proved accurate. Fortunately I was out very early this morning to check the garden’s progress. Besides there was some planting to do—2 Dahlia ‘Blue Boy’, 40 Gladiolus Blue Shades Mix and 3 Dahlia ‘Black Jack.’ Only about a third of the gladioli made it into the ground as I kept running into weeds that took a lot of time. I still have zinnia seeds to plant.

I also planted a pass-along from last fall I am excited about. It is a red dahlia from Libby at An Eye For Detail that her mother used to grow, so I feel extra responsibility to take care of this one. The tubers made it though the winter in my garage and even showed a bit of new growth.

Another new pass-along came from touring a garden club friend’s beautiful property last spring. She had potted up a variety of plants for us to take home and I selected Polygonatum biflorum (Solomon’s seal). I checked on this plant fairly recently and decided it must not have survived, but here it is after all.

Polygonatum biflorum(Solomon's seal)

Polygonatum biflorum(Solomon’s seal)

Before the work started I just enjoyed wandering around and around note-taking with my camera.

First views stepping out the back steps from the garage, looking due west with southern border on the left, panning north, and finally, looking down at Shasta daisies beside the garage steps.

Next I walked along the Southern border. There are three peonies here. The juniper hedge has grown tall. Aquilegia is everywhere. At the far end of the Southern border begins the shadiest corner in the garden.

Stachys byzantina (Lamb's Ear) and Peony in Southern Border

Stachys byzantina (Lamb’s Ear) and Peony in Southern Border

Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

 

Chrysogonum virginianum (Green and Gold)

Chrysogonum virginianum (Green and Gold)

Brunnera macrophylla ‘Silver Heart’ (False Forget-Me-Not), Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose), Phlox divaricata ‘Blue Moon’ (Woodland phlox)

Brunnera macrophylla ‘Silver Heart’ (False Forget-Me-Not), Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose), Phlox divaricata ‘Blue Moon’ (Woodland phlox)

Turning the corner toward the Western border, here is the Oakleaf hydrangea. I move it to the front of the border in early spring and it seems to be doing much better.

Hydrangea quercifolia 'Ruby Slippers'  (Lil' Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea)

Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’ (Lil’ Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea)

There are two small islands near this corner, one of which is planted with iris and a hodgepodge of other things. The iris foliage looks very brown. I thought it might be cold damage but I need to check for disease or iris borers.

Iris germanica (Bearded iris)  (bearded German Iris)

Looking toward the southwest corner. Iris germanica (Bearded iris) (bearded German Iris)

From here I turned around to my right to inspect the snapdragons in the meditation circle, almost ready to bloom. This is looking toward the northern border.

 

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon) in Meditation Circle

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon) in Meditation Circle

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon) in Meditation Circle

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon) in Meditation Circle

Returning to the oak leaf hydrangea and moving on along the Western border.

Liriope muscari and Dusty Miller

Liriope muscari and Dusty Miller

Euphorbia 'Ascot Rainbow'  (Ascot Rainbow Spurge)

Euphorbia ‘Ascot Rainbow’ (Ascot Rainbow Spurge)

Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

I stepped into the Western border and looked back southward across the the columbine. Many plants have died out in this area and the columbine is taking advantage. I need to get it under control.

Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

Turning back to continue the walk, this is the rest of the Western border as it curves around the meditation circle.

Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

Fading Phlox subulata with Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’ and 'Bride'

Fading Phlox subulata with Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’ and ‘Bride’

 

Tradescantia (Spiderwort)

Tradescantia (Spiderwort)

Later I will share the rest of the garden views from my Sunday morning promenade.

Advertisements

24 thoughts on “Sunday Morning Promenade — Part 1

    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Matt. I like that iris and oddly can’t quite place it. I think it must have come from a plant exchange. Don’t think it bloomed last year.

      Reply
  1. Christina

    Susie, I am impressed with your Anemones, they have grown really well, I need to plant more and closer together plus some more to cut! I really enjoyed this detailed walk around your garden.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Glad you enjoyed the tour. I know it was quite long but I wanted to record as much as I could. You encouraged me to give the anemones another try after they failed last year. Planting them in fall worked much better, although about a third didn’t come up.

      Reply
  2. Cathy

    Those anemones are lovely and tall. Love the way you photographed the Penstemon with the circle behind it too. You have such a lovely spring garden Susie. Look forward to seeing part two in a minute!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Cathy. The anemones began blooming soon after coming out of the ground and I was worried about them, but they kept getting taller. The penstemon is spreading itself around, one of the nice self-seeders.

      Reply
  3. Alberto

    Hi Susie, it seems yesterday you had your garden covered in snow and look what you have now! i really like that red aquilegia (and my like worths double since I’m not a fan of red and yellow flowers) and it looks just great with that dusty miller (which I had to google it to find out it’s actually a cineraria? It looked more like an artemisia to me…).
    Those anemones are great!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Hey Alberto, I’m loving those anemones this year. Christina also once suggested my dusty miller is actually artemisia. I have tried before to figure it out. Senecio cineraria is a possibility. Garden centers here sell an annual called dusty miller with thicker, sturdier leaves. This is perennial and has small insignificant flowers. It spreads easily. It was a passalong from an older relative and she always just referred to it as dusty miller.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Donna. The lawn is cool season fescue and it is at its best right now. Soon it will looks stressed by the heat. I’m excited the snapdragons made it through winter. These were my $.25 each bargains last October.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I like that name, anemone row! It was the only spot I could find to plant in last fall. I’ve seen hummingbirds twice now, and both times at the columbine. Nice to have them back.

      Reply
  4. Stephi

    Hi Susie, Your gardens look beautiful! I love the variety and lushness. I am a bit jealous of many of the plants you have that have died off in my yard.

    Reply
  5. johnvic8

    A marvelous post. One of these days I’m going to get a first-hand look at your lovely garden. You certainly have put together a most memorable one.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s