Morning Moments In The June Garden

Hemerocallis (Daylily) possibly 'Michael Arnholt'

Hemerocallis (Daylily) possibly ‘Michael Arnholt’

We had another nearly 100-degree day yesterday and yet, a fresh daylily greeted me in the garden first thing this morning. A thunderstorm during the night brought welcome rain and it is cooler today, a mere 91°F. Starting tomorrow temperatures will climb again into mid-90sF for another week. When summer starts officially on Sunday what surprise can it bring?

Hemerocallis (Daylily) possibly 'Michael Arnholt'

Hemerocallis (Daylily) possibly ‘Michael Arnholt’

Part of the Monarda border fell victim to the storm’s strong wind and rain, actually a small price to pay in exchange for not needing to water this morning.

Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm)

Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm)

I planted some new purple gladioli for cutting this year, but the first to flower is a salmon one from many years ago.

Gladiolus

Gladiolus

Several weeks ago I pulled up last fall’s snapdragons from the meditation circle, but as an experiment I left one along the front edge of the northern border. Surprisingly it continues to bloom despite the heat, its rich blossom, still drenched from last night’s rain, seems impossibly smooth and glossy red.

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)

Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon)

I added several new Liatris spicata (Gayfeather) to the border this spring. Rather than opening, some of the flower tips just turned brown from the heat, but this one is off to a good start.

Liatris spicata (Gayfeather)

Liatris spicata (Gayfeather)

With the appearance of its first multicolored flowers open today, Lantana camara is making a comeback in the southern border. It had died back to the ground during this year’s cold winter.

Lantana camara (Common lantana)

Lantana camara (Common lantana)

Just on the other side of the fence from the lantana, one of my favorite vignettes from this morning’s garden walk is a large patch of self-seeded Cleome at the southern entrance to the garden. While the gate and much of the garden was still in shade, the flowers were bathed in the sun’s early light.

Sunny Patch of Cleome hassleriana (Spider Flower)

Sunny Patch of Cleome hassleriana (Spider Flower)

A nectaring bee found the cleome enticing.

Bee Nectaring on Cleome hassleriana (Spider Flower)

Bee Nectaring on Cleome hassleriana (Spider Flower)

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22 thoughts on “Morning Moments In The June Garden

    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Judy. Wish the entire garden was as full as that area of Cleome. The rest is smoke and mirrors and very selective framing on the photos! The heat here is making summer a challenge and it’s not even quite summer.

      Reply
  1. mattb325

    I love that bee-balm and it looks rampant enough to easily recover from a few broken stems.
    I have just planted about two dozen gladioli bulbs as well! They are sadly still out-of-fashion in gardens, but I hope that, like the dahlia, they will make a comeback given how easy they are to grow.
    It is strange that the US doesn’t start summer until the solstice despite being so hot across 80% of the country by late May. In Australia, we use the start of the month to mark the seasons….incorrect I know, but it certainly seems to mirror the temperatures 🙂

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      You’re right Matt. There is still plenty of bee balm, but it’s looking a bit tired. The heat is strong, even for it. I have never seen such a warm June. Happy solstice to you.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Fortunately this cleome grew itself or I might not have any either. My zinnias and cosmos seeds failed miserably, both are usually reliable.

      Reply
  2. Cathy

    Lovely photos. Thank goodness you got some rain after all that heat. I grow snapdragons, cleome and lantana as summer container plants and the snapdragons look good all summer even if we have a really hot spell. Stay cool Susie!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Cathy, that rain helped a lot. Good to know about the snapdragons. Everyone pulls them out around here, but now I know better.

      Reply
  3. Pauline

    Over here we say that summer starts on June 1st, which makes the iris, poppies and peonies the first flowers of summer. Love you beautiful day lily, ours are full of buds but they haven’t started flowering yet, it won’t be long now. I would never survive in your heat,, thank goodness for our cooler temperatures!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      June 1st seems about right for start of summer Pauline, but I think my irises were done by then. Hope to see your daylilies featured on your blog.

      Reply
  4. rusty duck

    I sowed Liatris spicata seed this year, interesting to see yours in bloom because the photo on the packet wasn’t very good. Looking forward to it now, if the slugs leave it alone!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Hope they do well and slugs stay away. You’re wise to use seeds. I bought several Liatris on a whim and they were a little pricey. Hope you’ll like them I think they add a nice vertical element (which my garden sorely needs).

      Reply
  5. P&B

    I wish I had a 90 degree day up here. I admire your row of Monarda. Even when beaten up by the rain, they still looked much better than mine. How do you keep them from getting mildew?

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I know you do need some hot days in summer to get those crops going well. The Monarda does usually get mildew eventually, but I don’t treat it. So far this summer it hasn’t been a problem. I actually watered it some which may be reducing stress.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thank you. I agree, cleome have a great structure–very architectural–and so reliable. In NC large swaths of flowers are planted along the interstate highways for beautification. I saw day lilies this week in bloom, but the foliage looked like corn stalks do in the fall. Completely dried up.

      Reply

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