In A Vase On Monday—And Tuesday

Physostegia virginiana (Obedient Plant), Angelonia

Physostegia virginiana (Obedient Plant), Angelonia

My daughter and son-in-law are visiting from the west coast and we hosted a big gathering yesterday to give relatives and friends a chance to see them. It was a wonderful, wonderful day. I filled the house  with flowers and since it was Monday, I had planned to join Cathy’s weekly challenge In A Vase On Monday, but could not find time until this morning to photograph the arrangements.

There were literally a dozen vases of mostly zinnias, angelonia and obedient plant scattered around. I counted them this morning when trying to figure out if I wanted to carry them all upstairs into the studio where the light might be more conducive to picture taking. The answer was no, so I just picked up a couple to share.

Since I featured Physostegia virginiana last week I should have chosen something different but these two just happened to be sitting next to each other on the counter.

Physostegia virginiana (Obedient Plant), Angelonia

Physostegia virginiana (Obedient Plant), Angelonia

I like the structure of Physostegia virginiana in this arrangement with the repetition of curves, angles and lines among the flower heads.

Physostegia virginiana

Physostegia virginiana

 

Leftover short stems of Angelonia and a couple of Gomphrena globosa (Globe amaranth) collected into a round, glass dish made a simple, but attractive design. I think it is most interesting viewed from above.

Angelonia and Gomphrena globosa (Globe amaranth)

Angelonia and Gomphrena globosa (Globe amaranth)

Materials
Angelonia
Gomphrena globosa (Globe amaranth)
Physostegia virginiana (Obedient Plant)

Angelonia and Gomphrena globosa (Globe amaranth)

Angelonia and Gomphrena globosa (Globe amaranth)

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting. Discover what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday, where the goal is simply to fill a vase using materials gathered in one’s own garden.

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27 thoughts on “In A Vase On Monday—And Tuesday

  1. Donna@Gardens Eye View

    Susie I love the curving of your Physostegia virginiana….mine don’t generally curve at the tips but I love the artsy look they make. And the white Angelonia is lovely with the purples and pinks…..stunning from above. Sounds like you had quite a lovely party….

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Donna. The Physostegia seem more interesting to me this year than ever before. The party was wonderful–special get-togethers like that mean a lot.

      Reply
  2. Christina

    I’m sure you must have had a wonderful time with your daughter and family, it is always hard to live so far apart. I know you are a perfect hostess so all the guests must have had a great time. Adding so many flowers around the house really makes it feel like a very special occasion. I admire Physostegia virginiana in your vases and in others I’ve seen recently; is it really a native of Virginia? It seems to have coped well with the heat so perhaps I should try it. The second vase is lovely combination of textures too.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks, you’re so sweet. We are having such a good time and it will be hard to say goodbye. Yes, the “virginiana” in Physostegia virginiana does refer to the state of Virginia, but the plant is native to large parts of North America. I received this as a pass-along plant. It requires no care at all, but it does tend to flop and would benefit by staking (which I don’t bother with).

      Reply
  3. Cathy

    How lovely to have a gathering like this – and even more of an excuse for lots of vases scattered around. The ones you have featured are delightful in their simple elegance – and like other commenters I am going to seek out whether they can be successfully grown here. Is the amaranth related to the amaranthus with the long ‘lamb’s tail’ flowers?

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Cathy. All of the vases were simply arranged, but collectively made the house look festive. Gomphrena globosa and Amaranthus caudatus are from the same family: Amaranthaceae. Both are annuals and make nice dried flowers.

      Reply
  4. Chloris

    Lovely to celebrate a family get- together with flowers from your garden. The Physostegia is lovely and makes wonderful shapes. And that pretty little Angelonia which I admired before, is delightful with the Gomphrena.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I don’t always get the dusting done, but I do try to pluck some flowers when people are coming over. Angelonia has become my favorite annual.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Judy, that’s my favorite vase too. Wish you could see it in person. The photo doesn’t do it justice but those dark purples and reds are just scrumptious.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks so much. I’ve never noticed obedient plant much before, but it has an interesting structure, a little abstract. I use almost every vase in the house!

      Reply
  5. Beth @ PlantPostings

    Nice! I like the simple arrangements the best. Angelonia is a winner all the way around in my book. Today I saw a hummingbird nectaring on mine for the first time, so I know they like them. My sun garden (where the Angelonias are) is on the side of the house where I can’t see it from the inside. Next year, I’ll plant some Angelonia where I can see them out my window. 😉 Lovely vases and photos, as always!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Beth. I’m excited you’ve seen Angelonia being visited by hummingbirds. I’ve been a little unsure how attractive it is to pollinators. I’ve tried planting Angelonia in several locations around the house and it definitely loves the sun. Do you buy plants (which is what I do) or plant seeds (which I’m starting to see more readily available now)?

      Reply
  6. rickii

    I find your Obedient bouquet amusing, in the very best way. Setting the stage with flowers is one of the best ways to assure a successful party.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Not sure I have either, but have noticed it has a strong “instinct” to grow upright. So even when the wind knocks the stems over the flowers are always reaching to right themselves.

      Reply

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