Wordless Wednesday—Crocus Sativus

Crocus Sativus (Saffron crocus)

Crocus Sativus (Saffron crocus)

During a trip to Colonial Williamsburg in late September I bought 5 Crocus Sativus (Saffron crocus) bulbs. Yesterday they began blooming.

Crocus Sativus (Saffron crocus)

Crocus Sativus (Saffron crocus)

The 3 bright red-orange stigmas of the Saffron crocus can be harvested, dried and used in cooking.

The 3 bright red-orange stigmas of the Saffron crocus can be harvested, dried and used in cooking.

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30 thoughts on “Wordless Wednesday—Crocus Sativus

      1. Christina

        The foliage stays for ages; I was going to move some of mine last year and waited and waited until the foliage died back but in the end I left it too long; I will move them this year ‘in the green’.

  1. Christina

    Saffron is a very strong flavour; it is probably good that it costs more than gold so that there is less temptation to use too much. I love the flavour with shellfish.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Christina, I’ve long admired your saffron crocus so am doubly please to see these flower. Thanks for the tip about using saffron with shellfish. A quick web search revealed lots of recipes with that combination that I wouldn’t have thought of, including scallops which I know you love.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Yes, it’s a good reward for not tarrying too long before I planted the crocus. The sign at the market urged, “Plant NOW!” but even then I waited another week or two.

      Reply
  2. AnnetteM

    Well done for getting flowers – I had leaves only for two years and this year nothing at all! They are lovely though, so might try again in a different place.

    Reply
  3. Annette

    They are cultivated in the part of the Swiss Alps where I lived but I personally didn’t have any luck with them. Suppose I didn’t plant them in the best spot. Glad they grow for you 🙂

    Reply
  4. P&B

    Your saffron are probably happier than mine since it’s warmer down there and they can stretch their roots out. Next year you will have more of them that you can harvest and make tea with.

    Reply

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