In A Vase On Monday—Anemone Coronaria

In A Vase On Monday

In A Vase On Monday

Monday brings the chance to share cut flowers from the garden by joining in Cathy’s weekly challenge In A Vase On Monday.

In the garden on Saturday there were several anemones basking in sunlight. Anticipating their usefulness for today’s vase I brought them indoors early to condition.

Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’

Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’ in the garden Saturday

By Sunday morning violet blue ‘Mr. Fokker’ had opened completely and its white counterpart, ‘The Bride,’ was nearly so.

In A Vase On Monday - From Above

In A Vase On Monday – From Above

Anemone coronaria ‘Bride’ and ‘Mr. Fokker’

Anemone coronaria ‘Bride’ and ‘Mr. Fokker’

Anemone coronaria ‘Bride’ and ‘Mr. Fokker’

Anemone coronaria ‘Bride’ and ‘Mr. Fokker’

The poppy-like anemone flowers are not in pristine condition, the weather has been too harsh.

On the other hand Winter daphne, which did not bloom at all last year due to cold weather, has been magnificent this season.  A trio of branches form the foundation of today’s arrangement, holding the anemones in place without need for other mechanics. Daphne contributes rich dark green foliage and also delicate clusters of pink buds that turn white upon opening.

Daphne odora (Winter daphne) and Anemone coronaria

Daphne odora (Winter daphne) and Anemone coronaria

A gift from a friend, this Monday’s container is a high-gloss glazed mug from M.L. Owens Pottery, Seagrove, NC, circa 1975-76.

Initially I chose to use the mug because its size  (4 inches high by 3.25 inches in diameter) seemed perfect for the amount of materials I had collected. In the end I feel it is the vase’s strong color that completes the arrangement.  Vibrant and dramatic, the shiny red is a bold match for the pure hues of the anemones.

Red Seagrove Pottery Mug

Red Seagrove Pottery Mug

Materials
Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’
Anemone coronaria ‘The Bride’
Daphne odora (Winter daphne)
Glazed red mug (M.L. Owens Pottery, Seagrove, NC, circa 1975-76)

Anemone coronaria ‘Bride’ and ‘Mr. Fokker’

Anemone coronaria ‘Bride’ and ‘Mr. Fokker’

I am grateful to Cathy for hosting this weekly flower addiction. Visit her at Rambling In The Garden to discover what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday and feel free to join in.

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47 thoughts on “In A Vase On Monday—Anemone Coronaria

  1. Christina

    Blue and white, possibly my favourite colour combination; I love your vase this week. My A. The Bride are also flowering but on very short stems; are your white Anemones noticeably shorter than the blue? The strong colour of the vase is perfect with the flowers. Have a great week.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      It’s hard to drawn any conclusion about the anemones.The stem length and thickness vary from flower to flower and not many blues are flowering yet actually. One of these whites was the longest and I had to trim down to size, but it also grew on a spindly stem. Most whites so far have been very short-stemmed but I noticed they continue to lengthen as they open. Hope you have a happy week.

      Reply
  2. Cathy

    So very lovely, Susie, and the more you show these anemones the more I am excited about using them for Younger Daughter’s wedding – if they are flowering then, that is! How long are the stems, as this is something I will need to take into account?

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Hope you’ll have plenty of anemones to work with for the big day. You’ll want to find a more experience grower than I for such an important occasion. I’m still learning about anemones. Last year these anemones bloomed later and were in bloom at least until June. They were about 10-12 inches tall (25-30cm). So far this winter they are shorter, which I attribute to the cold weather, but don’t really know for sure.

      Reply
      1. Cathy

        It’s all pot luck really isn’t it – but far better for things to grow in their own time than being forced in artificial conditions as is done commercially…

    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Noelle, I do appreciate your comment. I try to get good photographs but feel sorely lacking in the skills of photography. Thinking of taking a course to build up some technique.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Julie. The Daphne has been a wonder. It stands alone in a vase very well or works to support other flowers. I planted a lot of new anemone but they have not emerged.

      Reply
  3. Judy @ NewEnglandGardenAndThread

    The flowers are beautiful, but I’m not sure I would have picked out the red cup. And, that shows who has creative talent and who doesn’t because it looks stunning together. 🙂 I loved the wonderful photos because every direction I look there are massive amounts of snow falling with a pretty good wind. No color here so thanks for sharing yours.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Judy, I don’t envy you the snow. For a while I thought you would end up without much this year–not to be, I guess. Despite a few blooms here and there, it is pretty drab where I am too. Rainy tonight and very cold all week. The red cup wasn’t the first thing I tried–you should see what got rejected!

      Reply
  4. rickii

    Your color sense is showing: the red cup shows everything else off to perfection. My Anemones are all the low growing A. blanda in white. Now that the cut flower bug has bitten I must plant some of these.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      It fun to rediscover vessels that have been around the house for ages and find they are just what I was looking for! The first year I was married I ordered anemones and now I think they must have been A. blanda. Mine didn’t do well and until a couple of years ago I hadn’t tried to grow any again. I do recommend them as cut flowers.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      The daphne disappointed me last year. Nearly all its leaves turned brown, but it survived beautifully. My anemone experience has been hit or miss, but when they make it they’re a real treat.

      Reply
  5. Kris P

    The mug makes a wonderful container for those beautiful anemones. I’ve seen a little anemone foliage but no sign of blooms in my own garden this season and, with our temperatures climbing, I suspect I’m not going to see any anemones here this year so keep the photos of yours coming, Susie!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Kris, I’ll gladly cut more anemones to share! Oh I do hope your anemones pull through. The foliage is a good sign. None yet on the bulbs I planted this autumn and I’m beginning to worry they won’t make it.

      Reply
  6. Hannah

    I love the purple color of your anemone, and the white one is so pretty with it, Susie. The daphnes must smell wonderful, I lost my winter one and need to get another one.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Hannah! Your comment led me off to study daphne. It had not occurred to me to look for daphne other than “winter” ones. Will have to look for others.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Yes, I’ve enjoyed having daphne in the house this year. It will easily last a couple of weeks. The buds do not continue to open however (at least mine have not).

      Reply
  7. Cathy

    I love the blue and white anemones, and you are right about the vase – I think an arrangement can look completely different in different vases, and the use of a strong colour really livens this up.The scent of the Daphne must be lovely too.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Seeing the anemones bloom this winter has been a surprise. Glad I found that red mug in the cupboard and tested it out this week. The daphne’s scent is a treat.

      Reply
  8. Cath

    I really envy you that lovely healthy Daphne, and the Bride is beautiful too. The oxblood red cup works in quite a stark graphic way with the way you’ve arranged the flowers in ‘stripes’ of colour.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Daphne has been a star this winter. Last year the buds were ruined and the leaves were totally browned by cold and I thought the shrubs would die. I’ve really appreciated them this year. Your description of the design is interesting and apt. I tend to favor reduction and abstraction.

      Reply
  9. AnnetteM

    It was lovely to see the Mr Fokker anemones as I planted some last year. They have just leaves at the moment, but if they are half as lovely as yours I will be happy.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Oh thanks Annette. I do hope your anemones flower well. These have come unexpectedly and sparsely this winter and I’m hoping they will be more prolific in spring.

      Reply

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