Art In Bloom On Thursday

Arrangement along West Building Walkway

Outdoor arrangement along West Building Walkway

The second annual Art In Bloom at the NC Museum of Art in Raleigh began yesterday. I arrived early and was greeted by colorful outdoor displays.

The walk from the car to the West Building was made special with a row of black urns filled with rich colors.

A series of urns lined the walkway toward the West Building where the show was held.

A series of these urns lined the walkway toward the West Building where the show was held.

 

Museum Park Volunteers and JAGG Classi Wholesale, Raleigh NC. Primary floral materials: bamboo, upright switch grass, northern sea oats, maiden grass, palmates

Design by Museum Park Volunteers and JAGG Classi Wholesale, Raleigh NC. Primary floral materials: bamboo, upright switch grass, northern sea oats, maiden grass, palmates

Horticulture students from North Carolina State University assembled a friendly planting with allium waving in the breeze above a field of narcissus in front of a Henry Moore.

Narcissus and Allium - NCSU Horticultural Dept

Narcissus and Allium – NCSU Horticultural Dept

Overnight and early morning rain and winds had knocked over some urns, even breaking one, along either side of the main entrance. While visitors lined up to enter the show, designers were frantically making some last-minute repairs. I liked the grapevines nests at the bottom of each one filled with roses and ranunculus.

West Building Entrance

These urns featured a grapevine nest of flowers. Partha Daughtridge, patio and Hearth Shop. palm, fiddlehead fern, grapevine, tulip, lily, iris, English rose, poppy, ranunculus.

Once inside it was impossible not to admire the floor to ceiling display of orchids, designed by Steve Taras at Watered Garden Florist.

Steve Taras, The Watered Garden Florist, Raleigh, N.C. ncma sponsor: Witherspoon Rose Culture

Steve Taras, The Watered Garden Florist, Raleigh, N.C.
ncma sponsor: Witherspoon Rose Culture

Steve Taras, The Watered Garden Florist

Steve Taras, The Watered Garden Florist

Steve revealed at a talk later in the morning, he had ordered 400 purple and white orchids and received only 30. The stress of creating for events like this must be intense. The museum’s Facebook page has a photo of the design team assembling this work the day before the show opened.

Orchids. Steve Taras

Orchids. Steve Taras

There were 56 floral designs. I selected only a couple to share to illustrate the variety of creations. The inspiration for the first one is The Garden Parasol, by American Impressionist painter, Frederick Carl Frieseke. The summer scene was painted in the artist’s garden at Giverny circa 1910.

Teresa Godfrey, AIFD, Floral Innovations, Washington, D.C. Floral-Innovations.com primary floral materials: mini calla lily, ranunculus, jasmine vine inspiration: The Garden Parasol, Frederick Carl Frieseke ncma sponsor: C.T. Weekends

The inspiration: The Garden Parasol, Frederick Carl Frieseke

Teresa Godfrey, of Floral Innovations, Washington, D.C., captured the light and the color of the painting using mini calla lily, ranunculus, jasmine vine.

Teresa Godfrey, AIFD, Floral Innovations, Washington, D.C. Floral-Innovations.com primary floral materials: mini calla lily, ranunculus, jasmine vine inspiration: The Garden Parasol, Frederick Carl Frieseke ncma sponsor: C.T. Weekends

Teresa Godfrey, AIFD, Floral Innovations, Washington, D.C. 
primary floral materials: mini calla lily, ranunculus, jasmine vine

Teresa Godfrey, AIFD, Floral Innovations, Washington, D.C. Floral-Innovations.com primary floral materials: mini calla lily, ranunculus, jasmine vine inspiration: The Garden Parasol, Frederick Carl Frieseke ncma sponsor: C.T. Weekends

Teresa Godfrey, AIFD, Floral Innovations, Washington, D.C. Inspiration: The Garden Parasol, Frederick Carl Frieseke

The curving line of the flowers and a thin wire framework suggests the Japanese parasol without being too heavy or too literal. Jasmine foliage recreates the shade trees of the painting.

Teresa Godfrey, AIFD, Floral Innovations, Washington, D.C. Floral-Innovations.com primary floral materials: mini calla lily, ranunculus, jasmine vine inspiration: The Garden Parasol, Frederick Carl Frieseke ncma sponsor: C.T. Weekends

Elements suggest the Japanese parasol and shade trees of the painting.

Dowels placed at the base perfectly match the color of the garden furniture and glass pieces reflect the scattered, dappled light.

Teresa Godfrey, AIFD, Floral Innovations, Washington, D.C. Floral-Innovations.com primary floral materials: mini calla lily, ranunculus, jasmine vine inspiration: The Garden Parasol, Frederick Carl Frieseke ncma sponsor: C.T. Weekends

The designer used color and interesting materials to sensitively recreate the seating and the dappled sunlight.

Another example from the show is by Michael Whaley, AIFD, Fresh Affairs, Raleigh, N.C. Whaley’s inspiration is Antefix in the Shape of a Satyr’s Head, Etruscan.

 inspiration: Antefix in the Shape of a Satyr’s Head, Etruscan

inspiration: Antefix in the Shape of a Satyr’s Head, Etruscan

Whaley used folded Cordyline fruticose (Ti leaves, palm lily) in a dramatic way.

Michael Whaley, AIFD, Fresh Affairs, Raleigh, N.C. freshaffairs.com inspiration: Antefix in the Shape of a Satyr’s Head, Etruscan

Michael Whaley, AIFD, Fresh Affairs, Raleigh, N.C. freshaffairs.com
inspiration: Antefix in the Shape of a Satyr’s Head, Etruscan

On Thursday I also attended two interesting presentations. Will see two more tomorrow and two on Sunday. Perhaps I can describe them at a later time.

To wrap up I leave you with a scene from the Triangle Bonsai Society’s display in the courtyard garden.

Triangle Bonsai Society

Triangle Bonsai Society

 

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23 thoughts on “Art In Bloom On Thursday

  1. Christina

    This is such an exciting and innovative show; I like seeing the Etruscan piece, did you choose it for me? I live in the midst of where the Etruscans lived over 2,000 years ago. There are traces of them all around us, I’ve even found pieces of their pottery in the garden here.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I thought you would enjoy the Etruscan selection. Christina. I think the floral design is strong and commanding interpretation. I tried to imagine what I might have solved the challenge.

      Reply
      1. Christina

        I don’t think I could do this at all. I didn’t think the first arrangement fitted very well but the Etruscan head was rather good.

  2. Marian St.Clair

    Incredible! The white urn, with the nest, is my favorite piece, because it is such a lovely expression of the season. The interpretation of the Frieseke painting is enchanting too, as is the painting itself.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Marian, I’ve always liked the Frieseke painting and I agree with you the white urns were charming too. The long entrance into the West Building was lined with urns similar in style.

      Reply
  3. An Eye For Detail

    Oh Susie: you know, I had this on my bulletin board and kept staring at it for weeks. Then I took it down; then I got busy; and now there is only one day left and I can’t go. Such a shame as I missed it last year after surgery. So next year for sure!!!!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Jason, it is a great show. The daffodils and allium would be nice to recreate but my daffodils are long gone and the alliums haven’t bloomed yet, though they have come up.

      Reply
  4. Donna@Gardens Eye View

    I can see why you wanted to get to this show…it is amazing…what creativity. I especially loved the display by The Watered Garden Florist…almost a floral evergreen….and even more amazing up close.

    Reply
  5. Cathy

    Some lovely displays there Susie. Especially that first one and the bouquet representing the painting. I love that wire frame as a parasol. I was given a bonsai as a gift yesterday – I doubt if it will ever look as good as that one in the courtyard though as I am hopeless with bonsai!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      How nice you were given a bonsai Cathy. Good luck with it. I appreciate bonsai but I know myself too well. Just wouldn’t get around to caring for one, rewiring and trimming roots, etc.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Hi Annette, thanks for the lovely sentiment. I made it to 3 of the 4 days of Art In Bloom and it was inspiring to see and hear such creative people and watch them at work.

      Reply

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