Phlox And Other Delights

Monday at the North Carolina Botanical Garden (NCBG) my husband and I enjoyed one of our favorite plantings, a wildflower display of Packera aurea (Golden Ragwort) and Phlox divaricata (Eastern Blue Phlox). Both are eastern North American natives. He is partial to the Golden Ragwort while I prefer the phlox. Together they make a great display, much more vivid in person.

Packera aurea (Golden Ragwort) and Phlox divaricata (Eastern Blue Phlox)

Packera aurea (Golden Ragwort) and Phlox divaricata (Eastern Blue Phlox)

A couple of Eastern Blue Phlox are blooming in my own garden. They have been difficult to establish but this year they finally seem settled.

Growing at pbmGarden: Phlox divaricata (Eastern Blue Phlox)

Growing at pbmGarden: Phlox divaricata (Eastern Blue Phlox)

There were still plenty of Trillium and May-Apple, Spreading Jacob’s Ladder was fresh, sweet shrub looked and smelled delicious. At every turn was something new to admire. If you have time to linger, click an image below to start the slideshow.

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26 thoughts on “Phlox And Other Delights

  1. Beth @ PlantPostings

    Oh my, it’s a smorgasbord of wildflower beauty! It’s about to happen in my woodland, as well. The Mayapples, Bloodroot, etc., are poking through the soil. We’re later, but it’s still just as sweet. Happy spring!

    Reply
  2. Julie

    What a beautiful place to visit Susie, lovely photographs too. I’m trying to grow Phlox divaricata again at home, as I love the colour and its fragrance, my last clump only lived a few years as I did not give it enough of a humus rich soil.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Hope you can reestablish Phlox divaricate Julie. Even at the botanical garden I’ve noticed there are fewer of them than several years ago. Thanks for the tip–I’ll try to add humus to give them a boost.

      Reply
  3. rusty duck

    I wish I could establish Trillium. They do well in their first year and then never return. Such a shame. Either my soil is too heavy or something is feasting on them!

    Reply
  4. Christina

    I love that pale blue; reminds me of a plant I grow here, whose name escapes me for the moment. I’ll come back when I remember. I love the image with the ferns – beautiful.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Yes, that blue is wonderful. This is a much nicer time of year for seeing this garden than when you were here. There are tons of ferns unfurling, native azaleas, scented geraniums, etc.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      We saw a rabbit at this garden the day we visited, happily chomping down on something. The first one always looks so cute we didn’t want to disturb it.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      This is a native plant and is featured at quite a few of the other botanical gardens and sold as a garden plant. Apparently the leaves contain low toxicity alkaloid (Pyrrolizidine) so animals don’t eat it (except sheep). Natives Americans used it medicinally, but according to wikipedia entry: “In contemporary times, P. aurea is not much used due to its saturated pyrrolizidine alkaloids which can cause liver veno-occlusive disease upon metabolism. If used, a PA-free extract would be required for safe use for more than a two-week course.” (Wikipedia)

      Reply
  5. P&B

    The NCBG looks so lush and peaceful. I love woodland phlox both for their look and their scent. They’re just starting to bloom now.

    Reply
  6. sweetbay

    The display of woodland phlox at the garden is wonderful. I haven’t been there yet this spring, unfortunately. I wish the Garden stayed open later than 5. I always enjoy seeing the Florida azalea by the Totten Center.

    Reply

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