Tag Archives: Bearded Iris

In A Vase On Monday—Clematis Trio

In A Vase On Monday - Clematis Trio

In A Vase On Monday – Clematis Trio

Monday brings the chance to share cut flowers from the garden by joining in Cathy’s weekly challenge In A Vase On Monday.

At the garden center last week two glazed ceramic planter saucers caught my attention. For some time I had been looking for a square black dish to use for floral arrangements. This style came in several other tempting colors, but I settled on black and white.

The new containers lend themselves to Ikebana-style designs, as do Clematis which are happily in flower this week.

In A Vase On Monday - Clematis Trio

In A Vase On Monday – Clematis Trio

Today’s design turned out quite differently from my original plan to use a red Clematis ‘Niobe’ on the white dish and white Clematis ‘Henryi’ on the black. The effect was underwhelming in this case, but I am tucking the idea away for the future.

Fortunately I had gathered additional material, Clematis ‘Jackmanii’ and several kinds of iris, most of which soon found their way into the arrangement.

Clematis Trio – C. ‘Jackmanii’, C. ‘Niobe’ and C. ‘Henryi’

Iris leaves were added for height along with Iris germanica ‘Orinoco Flow’ and Iris tectorum. A small amount of red-purple-greenish foliage of Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ was also incorporated behind C. ‘Jackmanii’.

In A Vase On Monday - Clematis TrioIn A Vase On Monday – Clematis Trio

Materials
Flowers
Clematis ‘Henryi’
Clematis ‘Jackmanii’
Clematis ‘Niobe’
Iris germanica ‘Orinoco Flow’ (Bearded iris)
Iris tectorum (Japanese Roof Iris)

Foliage
Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ (Beardtongue)
Iris germanica ‘Orinoco Flow’ (Bearded iris)

Clematis ‘Henryi’

Clematis ‘Henryi’

Clematis ‘Niobe’ With Iris tectorum (Japanese Roof Iris)

Clematis ‘Niobe’ With Iris tectorum (Japanese Roof Iris)

Clematis ‘Jackmanii’

Clematis ‘Jackmanii’

Thanks to Cathy for hosting this weekly flower addiction. Visit her at Rambling In The Garden to discover what she and other gardeners are placing In A Vase On Monday.

Garden Bloggers Foliage Day – April 2016

It is time again for Garden Bloggers Foliage Day (GBFD), hosted by Christina at Garden of the Hesperides.

The dogwood for now is green. There were only a handful of flowers this spring—the most disappointing dogwood display ever. I keep threatening to remove the poor performer but inertia keeps it safe for now.

Cornus florida (Flowering Dogwood)

Cornus florida (Flowering Dogwood)

Below, this this early morning scene highlights the fresh green iris foliage which is very strong and healthy this year. Beside them, in the foreground on the right, green-gray catmint is filling out and up. Looking beyond irises, just beyond the meditation circle, a large circle of daffodil foliage is dying back slowly. Narcissus are wonderful in early spring, but I pay the price of planting them in the middle of the lawn by having to watch the leaves yellow and wilt.

Further back are five evergreens, Juniperus chinensis ‘Blue Point’ (Blue Point Juniper). They were planted to add some height and privacy to the garden. Because I worked around some existing plants, they are not necessarily situated in the most effective way, but they do help with privacy.

At left behind the fence the neighbors’ red maple is gorgeous this year. Back inside the fence the tall trees in the right back corner are Cupressus arizonica ‘Carolina Sapphire’ (Arizona Cypress) awash in the early morning sun that has yet to reach the rest of the garden. And the large shrub on the right is Spiraea prunifolia (bridal wreath spiraea). It is sending out suckers everywhere and needs a severe pruning, my intended task for this morning.

Iris germanica (Bearded iris)

Iris germanica (Bearded iris)

Lots of plants are bringing great promise. Not all, but many, of these early plants have lovely silvery foliage, such as Lychnis coronaria (Rose Campion) and, in the background, overly abundant Stachys byzantina (Lamb’s Ear). Echinacea are maturing, with a few already forming flowers.

Lychnis coronaria (Rose Campion)

Lychnis coronaria (Rose Campion)

Last fall the garden was overgrown when I was trying to plant allium. I just cleared a spot and stuck all the bulbs together. That pretty much sums up my gardening style. I have been reading this spring about suggestions for underplanting alliums to hide their foliage, so lesson learned.

Allium ‘Gladiator’ (Giant Allium) (3 bulbs) Allium ‘Persian Blue’ (Giant Allium) (3 bulbs) Allium azureum (Blue Allium) (10 bulbs)

Allium ‘Gladiator’ (Giant Allium) (3 bulbs)
Allium ‘Persian Blue’ (Giant Allium) (3 bulbs)
Allium azureum (Blue Allium) (10 bulbs)

Here are a few more images to wrap up this April foliage highlight.

Side Path-Iris, Lavender and Stachys byzantina (Lamb's Ear)

Side Path-Iris, Lavender and Stachys byzantina (Lamb’s Ear)

Perovskia atriplicifolia (Russian Sage) and Salvia guaranitica 'Black and Blue'

Perovskia atriplicifolia (Russian Sage) and Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue’

Narcissus, Asclepias tuberosa (Butterfly Plant) and Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower)

Narcissus, Asclepias tuberosa (Butterfly Plant) and Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower)

Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm) and Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm) and Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

Iris, Lavender and Stachys byzantina (Lamb's Ear)

Iris, Lavender and Stachys byzantina (Lamb’s Ear)

Hemerocallis (Daylily) and Artemisia 'Powis Castle' (Wormwood)

Hemerocallis (Daylily) and Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ (Wormwood)

Chrysanthemum and Stachys byzantina (Lamb's Ear)

Chrysanthemum and Stachys byzantina (Lamb’s Ear)

Thanks to Christina at Garden of the Hesperides for hosting. Read her foliage update and see more links to foliage perspectives from many parts of the world.

In A Vase On Monday—Violet To Green

In A Vase On Monday—Violet To Green

In A Vase On Monday—Violet To Green

Monday brings the chance to share cut flowers from the garden by joining in Cathy’s weekly challenge In A Vase On Monday.

Embodied by yellow-green hellebores tinted in red violet the palette for today’s flowers covers my favorite half the color wheel. Reddish-purple bearded iris, violet blue anemone and a lime green container supplement the scheme.

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Several white Anemone coronaria ‘Bride’ offer a restful element.

Anemone coronaria ‘Bride’

Anemone coronaria ‘Bride’

 

Included last week as well, the reddish purple bearded iris has been blooming just over a week in the garden.  It is lightly scented.

Iris germanica (Bearded iris)

Iris germanica (Bearded iris)

Prolific Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’ continues to thrill. Newly opened flowers are richly hued, while older one fade to a lovely lavender.

Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’

Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’

Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’

Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’

Materials
Anemone coronaria ‘Bride’
Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’
Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)
Iris germanica (Bearded iris)
Ikebana floral pin
Fiesta soup mug

It is always best to work with the correct container from the beginning. This design feels slightly too tall and not wide enough for the substituted mug, making it seem out of proportion. I began this arrangement with another vase in mind, but it turned out to be too small. Although it did not work out as planned, the mug’s color picks up the green of the hellebore nicely and gives a nice overall pop to the design.

In A Vase On Monday—Violet To Green

In A Vase On Monday—Violet To Green

These are not the only colors in my spring garden but if I had to I could be happy with this palette.

In A Vase On Monday—Violet To Green

In A Vase On Monday—Violet To Green

Thanks to Cathy for hosting this weekly flower addiction. Visit her at Rambling In The Garden to discover what she and other gardeners are placing In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday—Inky Array

In A Vase On Monday - Inky Array

In A Vase On Monday – Inky Array

Monday brings the chance to share cut flowers from the garden by joining in Cathy’s weekly challenge In A Vase On Monday.

Yesterday before heading out for the last day of Art In Bloom at the NC Museum of Art in Raleigh I quickly assembled an arrangement for today. The flowers had been gathered from my garden on Saturday evening and left to condition overnight. Certainly these blossoms are less opulent, less exotic than what I have been experiencing this week, but they are beautiful and interesting in their own right.

Dark inky purples are among my favorite flowers and when the flowers in question are iris and clematis, I am content. Clematis ‘Jackmanii’ opened this week, along with an unknown bearded iris (reddish-purple) and another with falls marked with stitched edges. I believe the latter is Iris germanica ‘Orinoco Flow.’

Clematis 'Jackmanii'

Clematis ‘Jackmanii’

Iris germanica (Bearded iris)

Iris germanica (Bearded iris)

Iris germanica ‘Orinoco Flow’

Iris germanica ‘Orinoco Flow’

Coloring the edge of the northern garden border are spikes of Salvia nemorosa ‘May Night’ and they make a natural choice to be used as companions.

In A Vase On Monday - Inky Array

In A Vase On Monday – Inky Array

Several stems of Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft) and one sprig of fresh lavender finish off the arrangement.  A multi-stemmed container allows each bloom its independence and room to stand out.

In A Vase On Monday

In A Vase On Monday

Materials
Clematis ‘Jackmanii’
Iris germanica ‘Orinoco Flow’ (Bearded iris)
Iris germanica (Bearded iris)
Salvia nemorosa ‘May Night’ (Hardy Sage)
Multicolored, multi-stemmed ceramic vase

Underside of Clematis 'Jackmanii'

Underside of Clematis ‘Jackmanii’

Iris germanica ‘Orinoco Flow’

Iris germanica ‘Orinoco Flow’

Thanks to Cathy for hosting this weekly flower addiction. Visit her at Rambling In The Garden to discover what she and other gardeners are placing In A Vase On Monday.

Garden Bloggers Foliage Day – March 2015

Lupinus ‘Woodfield Hybrids’ (Lupine)

Lupinus ‘Woodfield Hybrids’ (Lupine)

It is Garden Bloggers Foliage Day (GBFD), an opportunity to notice the value foliage plays in the garden, as feature or support. GBFD is hosted by Christine at  Creating my own garden of the Hesperides.

This month I have been trimming back and clearing last year’s growth to make way for emerging perennials and bulbs. In the grace period before the acoustic imposition of air conditioners and lawn mowers begins, this a quiet time in the garden. Peaceful. There is space for birdsong and thought.

During this cleanup I welcome back old garden favorites, delight at greeting new additions from fall plantings, and occasionally panic upon finding things I cannot quite recognize as friend or foe.

Last April I purchased a lupine from a local garden center and placed it at the back of the border. It had a few blooms but I hope it is established now and will provide a better show. Its palmate whorls look fresh and eager.

Lupinus ‘Woodfield Hybrids’ (Lupine)

Lupinus ‘Woodfield Hybrids’ (Lupine)

Nepeta ‘Walker’s Low’ (Catmint) sits near the gate at the northern entrance to the garden. Recently I trimmed back all the brown stems from last year to find its gray-green new growth.

Nepeta 'Walker's Low' (Catmint)

Nepeta ‘Walker’s Low’ (Catmint)

Irises are among the old friends I look forward to each year. Suddenly strong new sword-shaped leaves have begun reaching upwards. These Iris germanica (Bearded iris) are cherished pass-alongs from a long-ago neighbor.

Iris germanica (Bearded iris)

Iris germanica (Bearded iris)

Clematis ‘Jackmanii’ began budding before I had time to prune it this year.

Clematis 'Jackmanii'

Clematis ‘Jackmanii’

In autumn I planted Anemone coronaria (‘Admiral’, ‘Bride,’ and ‘Mr. Fokker’) and for a few weeks I have been happily watching the leaves emerge. I am afraid the voles have damaged many, but I cannot think how to negotiate a truce with them.

Anemone coronaria

Anemone coronaria

Last spring the buds on the Coral Delight Camellia were damaged by a cold snap, but this year its flowers are beginning to open. Actually there must have been one flower last year that made it as evidenced by this thick, hard seed pod that was still attached to the bush.

Camellia x 'Coral Delight' Seedpod

Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’ Seedpod

Thanks to Christine at Creating my own garden of the Hesperides for hosting GBFD each month.

A Garden Review of 2014: Spring

Cornus florida (Flowering Dogwood)

Cornus florida (Flowering Dogwood) April 13, 2014

Today Cathy at Words and Herbs published a special look back at her 2014 spring garden. I decided to join her on this journey to review the garden in three segments: Spring, Summer, and Late Summer/Autumn – one each week running up to Christmas.

I may do a more extensive review around the first of the year, but for now here are a few things that stood out this Spring.

March

The winter was very cold and wet. The morning of March 4 found the garden encrusted with a layer of sleet. Normally in early March temperatures would be nearing 60F/15.5C. By March 18 daffodils had opened but the garden lay under an icy glaze.

Garden Under Ice - March 4, 2014

Garden Under Ice – March 4, 2014

When the vernal equinox occurred here on March 20, 2014, a most welcome reprieve brought blue sky, sunshine and warm temperatures.

Hyacinthus orientalis (common hyacinth)

Hyacinthus orientalis (common hyacinth)

This Narcissus 'King Alfred' weathered the recent ice storm

This Narcissus ‘King Alfred’ weathered an ice storm

By the end of March I was way behind on garden chores. It was still raining, but the spiraea was blooming and the grass was turning green.

Garden View In Early Morning Rain-March 29, 2014

Garden View In Early Morning Rain-March 29, 2014

April

What a difference flipping over a calendar page makes. On April 4 the temperature was 79°F (26°C) at 7:00pm. The native redbud was blooming, spiraea was bursting with blossoms, and the soft green leaves of Eastern red columbine were unfurling.

Cercis canadensis L. (Eastern Redbud)

Cercis canadensis L. (Eastern Redbud)

Spiraea

Spiraea

Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

By mid-April it was still raining.  The garden seemed to be lifting itself upward, turning green, and filling out.

Garden View On Rainy Mid-April Morning

Garden View On Rainy Mid-April Morning

In time for Garden Bloggers Foliage Day there was plenty of fresh new growth.

Northern Border View Facing West

Northern Border View Facing West, April 23, 2014

It pleased me to no end to see an Anemone coronaria in my garden this spring. I had planted 40 bulbs, but rather late, and only one came up. Was it too late? Did the voles eat them? I do not really know, but yesterday I planted a new set of bulbs, so I hope to see many more next spring.

Anemone coronaria 'Governor' (Governor Double Poppy Anemone)

Anemone coronaria ‘Governor’ (Governor Double Poppy Anemone), April 23, 2014

By the time April ended the irises were lighting up the borders.

Iris tectorum (Japanese Roof Iris)

Iris tectorum (Japanese Roof Iris)

Iris germanica (Bearded iris)-2

Iris germanica (Bearded iris) April 28, 2014

Iris germanica 'Raspberry Blush'

Iris germanica ‘Raspberry Blush’

Iris germanica ‘Batik’

Iris germanica ‘Batik’

May

In early May there were many more wonderful irises to enjoy. This part of the year is when my garden is most enjoyable.

Iris germanica (Bearded iris)  (bearded German Iris)-3

Iris germanica (Bearded iris)

Iris germanica 'Immortality'

Iris germanica ‘Immortality’

By May 10 there were still more irises and I was enjoying their rich blues and violets.

Iris germanica (Bearded iris)

Iris germanica (Bearded iris)

Iris germanica (Bearded iris)

Iris germanica (Bearded iris)

Iris germanica (Bearded iris) In Northern Border

Iris germanica (Bearded iris) In Northern Border

Other colors than blues do show up in the garden though. Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine) and Tradescantia (Spiderwort) were spilling over in the western border a few days later, May 14. The aquilegia had been blooming 5 weeks by then.

Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine) and Tradescantia (Spiderwort)

Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine) and Tradescantia (Spiderwort)

May brought more happiness as irises in the (southward facing) North Border were joined by lush peonies, phlox, nepeta, foxglove and Sweet William. Here are some views from May 21. If only the garden could stay like this.

Paeonia 'Pink Parfait' (Peony)

Paeonia ‘Pink Parfait’ (Peony)

Paeonia 'Pink Parfait' (Peony)

Paeonia ‘Pink Parfait’ (Peony)

Nepeta 'Walker's Low' (Catmint), Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox)

Nepeta ‘Walker’s Low’ (Catmint), Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox)

Digitalis purpurea 'Pam's Choice' (Pam's Choice Foxglove)

Digitalis purpurea ‘Pam’s Choice’ (Pam’s Choice Foxglove)

Dianthus barbatus (Sweet William)

Dianthus barbatus (Sweet William)

A big thanks to Cathy for inspiring me to prepare this garden review. As I am trying to consider changes for this coming year, it was instructive to reflect on my 2014 spring garden.

May Flowers

Paeonia ‘Festiva Maxima’

Paeonia ‘Festiva Maxima’

The garden found its confidence this week, reaching that special springtime peak of blooms that brings abundance, exuberance and balance. It brought such enjoyment and excitement I could hardly contain myself. I checked on the garden’s progress over and over throughout each day and it filled my thoughts even when I had to be elsewhere.

This spring, unlike the past few, I have not been able to dedicate my time to gardening, and when I had time I often did not feel that pull of the garden’s magic calling me to come out and play. This means the weeding has never been quite finished; tradescantia, columbine, common roadside daylilies and other unruly spreaders have not been brought under control; no compost or mulch has been carefully laid to accentuate the beds. But, the garden forgave all this and rewarded me anyway with, as my pbmGarden tagline suggests, a sense of place, purpose, rejuvenation and joy.

Clematis ‘Jackmanii’ is a true delight at the top of the Southern side path near the entrance to the main garden. Native Baptisia ‘Purple Smoke’ (visible in the middle right-hand side) is just coming into flower in front of a mound of Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ (Wormwood). Sunny yellow bearded irises have been blooming for two full weeks and were among the first irises to open.

Clematis 'Jackmanii' in Southern Side Path

Clematis ‘Jackmanii’ in Southern Side Path

The southern border is full of pale yellow Japanese Iris and a few Iris germanica (Bearded iris), such as this dark, almost black, one.

Iris germanica (Bearded iris) in Southern Border

Iris germanica (Bearded iris) in Southern Border

Iris germanica (Bearded iris)

Iris germanica (Bearded iris)

Yesterday one of this border’s three peonies opened. All three were planted last year. One, Paeonia lactiflora ‘Black Beauty’ (Nightlife Peony), has no buds this year, so it must want another year to mature. Another peony came from a plant exchange in my neighborhood and has a few buds. It is Paeonia ‘Festiva Maxima.’

This white one with red accents was purchased as Paeonia lactiflora ‘Duchess de Nemours’ but it turned out to be Paeonia ‘Festiva Maxima’. [Thanks to Chloris for identifying it.]

Paeonia ‘Festiva Maxima’

Paeonia ‘Festiva Maxima’

Farther down the border are two rose bushes, the same old-fashioned one featured in my last Monday vase. This special pass-along rose is full of pink blossoms. Nearby, visible in the lower left, is a newly added smooth hydrangea, Hydrangea arborescens Incrediball ‘Abetwo’. Incrediball was recommended last year by Carolyn.

Old-fasioned Rose

Old-fasioned Rose

In nearly opposite position, on the northern side of the garden, another of these roses is growing, alongside a huge clump of Tradescantia (Spiderwort).
Tradescantia (Spiderwort) and Old fasioned Rose

The northern border is full of Iris germanica (Bearded iris). This dusky lavender one is another pass-along from my friend Henrietta. It is one of the latest to open.

Iris germanica (Bearded iris)

Iris germanica (Bearded iris)

This nearly black bud is the same Iris germanica (Bearded iris) as the one shown earlier that was blooming in the southern border. It will open to a dark purple.

Nearly black Iris germanica (Bearded iris)

Nearly black Iris germanica (Bearded iris)

I adore this Dianthus barbatus (Sweet William) and began last year trying to re-establish it in my garden. It seems a rather old-fashioned flower that I do not see growing often. The bloom carries a sweet fragrance.

Dianthus barbatus (Sweet William)

Dianthus barbatus (Sweet William)

Yet another Iris from my friend Henrietta many years ago, this has pale lavender standards and regal purple falls tinged with oxblood and white.

Iris germanica (Bearded iris) In Northern Border

Iris germanica (Bearded iris) In Northern Border

Iris germanica (Bearded iris) In Northern Border

Iris germanica (Bearded iris) In Northern Border

Meadow Sage ‘May Night’, Tradescantia (Spiderwort), Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox) and Nepeta ‘Walker’s Low’ (Catmint) are all in bloom, filling the Northern Border with color and just filling it in general. It was not long ago that the borders seemed empty.

Northern Border

Northern Border

Meadow Sage ‘May Night’, Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox)

Meadow Sage ‘May Night’, Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox)

Meadow Sage ‘May Night’, Tradescantia (Spiderwort), Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox)

Meadow Sage ‘May Night’, Tradescantia (Spiderwort), Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox)

Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox) In Northern Border

Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox) In Northern Border

This Phlox is another pass-along from my garden mentor that I have grown now for many years. It just began blooming in the last couple of days.

Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox) In Northern Border

Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox) In Northern Border

Also opening this week, Nepeta ‘Walker’s Low’ (Catmint) is easy to grow and low maintenance. It works well as a front of the border plant.

Nepeta 'Walker's Low' (Catmint)

Nepeta ‘Walker’s Low’ (Catmint)

Behind the Nepeta another peony, Paeonia ‘Pink Parfait’ is preparing to bloom.

eony Paeonia 'Pink Parfait'

Peony Paeonia ‘Pink Parfait’

Here is a longer view, looking down the length of the northern border toward the west. I had to remove some winter-damaged trees from the western border, leaving a few problem areas I try to spin as growth opportunities.

Northern Border With Meditation Circle

Northern Border With Meditation Circle

There are a lot of other individual plants creating interest when viewed close-up, but I must leave them for another time. I will wrap this up for today with a few general garden views of the May garden.

Garden View With Meditation Circle

Garden View With Meditation Circle

Garden View With Meditation Circlw

Garden View With Meditation Circlw

Garden View With Meditation Circle

Garden View With Meditation Circle

Garden View Toward Southwest Corner

Garden View Toward Southwest Corner

Garden View Toward Southern Border

Garden View Toward Southern Border

Hope your garden is making you happy today.