Tag Archives: Camellia ‘Coral Delight’

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Forward

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Forward

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share an arrangement using materials collected from the garden.

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Forward

Spring forward—yesterday marked a return to daylight savings time and we set clocks ahead by one hour. Despite the optimistic spring forward mnemonic, I gathered my flowers well ahead this week, on Friday, to stay ahead of winter’s return. A light snow fell briefly Sunday morning dusting the garden for a couple of hours before giving way to bright blue skies and sunshine. Early forecast models had predicted this might be a much bigger event than it was, but we could not escape below-freezing temperatures for several nights.

With impending cold and snow in mind I collected freely and was able to assemble a couple of designs.

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Forward

Both arrangements include Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’ for a rich punch of color and lovely pure white Narcissus ‘Thalia’ for springtime freshness.

Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’

Narcissus ‘Thalia’ just opened during the past week.

White Narcissus ‘Thalia’

The first arrangement places Mr. Fokker in a Portmerion porcelain vase with a botanic pattern with echoes of blues, greens and a blush of pink. Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’ enlivens the effect, subtle hellebores add balance.

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Forward

Although designed to be viewed from the front, the back of this arrangement shows off the Acuba’s gold flecks on dark green leaves.

Outside, arching branches of Eastern redbud are in bloom.

Back view highlights Acuba foliage. Eastern redbud is visible outdoors.

The second arrangement was intended to be a simple pitcher of daffodils, the newly opened Narcissus ‘Thalia’, and mostly is.

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Forward

In my experience daffodils are strong-willed, non-compliant participants in flower arrangements and work best when used alone. I forgot that lesson this week and fiddled with them for way too long. After a struggle I conceded and let them sit where they wanted; however, I did insist they share the vase with several anemones, grape hyacinths, candytuft and a single Tahiti double daffodil.

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Forward

The small bits of muscari and Iberis sempervirens add interesting texture and work well with the colors scheme.

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Forward

The stoneware container holding this second design was a wedding gift from my college roommate. I enjoy using this piece. It was made by a well-known local potter, Jim Pringle.

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Forward

 

Materials

Flowers
Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’
Anemone coronaria ‘The Bride’
Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’ (Synonym: Camellia japonica x Camellia saluenensis)
Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)
Hyacinth orientalis ‘Blue Jacket’
Hyacinth Sunrise Mix
Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)
Muscari (Grape Hyacinth)
Narcissus ‘Thalia’
Foliage
Aucuba japonica ‘Variegata’ (Gold Dust Aucuba)
Vases
Portmerion- Botanic vase made in England
Stoneware pitcher glazed with bands of cream, green, blue. (from set of 4 cups and pitcher, Pringle Pottery, North Carolina, circa 1977)

Snow or no, this looks like spring to me. Has the season changed for you yet?

In A Vase On Monday – Spring Forward

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us a chance to express our flower arranging passion. Visit her to discover what she and others found this week in their winter gardens to place In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday – Shades Of Pink

In A Vase On Monday - Shades Of Pink

In A Vase On Monday – Shades Of Pink

Spring-like temperatures alerted flowers throughout the borders to awaken early this year. Then weekend brought the dreaded below-freezing lows that make farmers and backyard gardeners alike wring their hands. As I looked out Sunday morning, sure enough the neighbor’s saucer magnolia that had seemed primed for loveliness this year instead stood sagging with browned flowers.

In anticipation of joining Cathy at Rambling In The Garden in sharing a Monday vase, I browsed the garden late Sunday morning to gather materials. Surprisingly I found plenty of blooms still looking perky and bright. The ones I collected this week were mostly pink, starting with a winter flowering Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’ that had begun showing color by February 24 and finally opened last week.

Camellia x 'Coral Delight'

Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’

I used hellebores last week but these stood out in that each stem had two flowers with very different colors. The top, more recently opened bloom was pink but the lower one had matured toward a striking lime green.

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Several branches of native Eastern redbud covered in tight clusters of pink flowers were used to add height, rhythm, and a bit of drama to the arrangement.

In A Vase On Monday - Shades Of Pink

In A Vase On Monday – Shades Of Pink

Cercis canadensis L. (Eastern Redbud)

Cercis canadensis L. (Eastern Redbud)

Mounds of pure white Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft) are the final ingredient in today’s Monday offering. This is one of my favorite ground covers.

Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)

Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)

Materials
Anemone coronaria ‘The Bride’
Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’ (Synonym: Camellia japonica x Camellia saluenensis)
Cercis canadensis L. (Eastern Redbud)
Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)
Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)
2.5 inch florist’s frog (floral pin holder)
Small black plastic Solo bowl
Black glazed, square ceramic pot base

In A Vase On Monday - Shades Of Pink

In A Vase On Monday – Shades Of Pink

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us a chance to express our flower arranging passion. Visit her to discover what she and others found this week in their winter gardens to place In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday—Late February Profferings

In A Vase On Monday - Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

In A Vase On Monday – Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Each Monday brings the chance to join Cathy’s In A Vase On Monday to share an arrangement using materials gathered from the garden.  After last Monday’s snow, sleet and ice covered the garden once more, the weather relented, and the days since have been mild and mostly sunny.

The Coral Delight Camellia featured last week with rescued, faded blooms is back with a fresher look. And Hellebores deserve a share of spotlight as they are at last coming into full flower in the garden.

Late February Profferings

Late February Profferings

As I gathered these cut flowers on Sunday morning I intended to work them all into a single arrangement. But after conditioning them in water (while my husband and I ran out to brunch with a friend), it seemed quicker and more manageable to keep the two main types of flowers separated.

There were a half-dozen camellias in bloom, perfect for displaying in a set of footed cordial glasses.

In A Vase On Monday - Camellia x 'Coral Delight'

In A Vase On Monday – Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’

In A Vase On Monday - Camellia x 'Coral Delight'

In A Vase On Monday – Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’

Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’ has a semi-double flower, deep coral pink in color. The plant is slow-growing, aspiring to 6-8 feet high. This one is about 4.5 feet tall after about ten years, with dark, shiny foliage.

The blooms are brushed with white markings on the petals.

Camellia x 'Coral Delight'

Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’

Camellia x 'Coral Delight'

Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’

Hellebores in my garden have been reluctant to open this winter. I visited a hellebore farm yesterday with a friend and we were surprised to find fewer blooming plants than imagined. When I have organized my pictures I will write more about the visit and purchases.

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Only one daffodil was blooming yesterday, but many more are about to burst onto the scene.  I included it with the hellebores for a sparkle of color. Purple stems of statice from a store-bought bouquet from last month and a piece of Shorty Euphorbia from last week’s vase were used as filler.

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

The hellebores were placed into a Portmeirion Botanic Garden vase, detailed with pansy motif and leaves around the rim.

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Materials
Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’
6 Cordial glasses (footed) with silver caddy

Euphorbia ‘Shorty’ (shorty Spurge)
Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)
Limonium sinuatum (statice)
Narcissus ‘King Alfred’ (trumpet daffodil)
Portmeirion Botanic Garden vase

Thanks to Cathy for hosting this weekly flower arranging addiction. Visit her at Rambling In The Garden to discover what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday and feel free to join in.

In A Vase On Monday—Two Delights

In A Vase On Monday-Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’

Each Monday brings the chance to join Cathy’s In A Vase On Monday to share an arrangement using materials gathered from the garden.  Today I have two small, but colorful, vases to share.

First Vase

Camellia x 'Coral Delight'

Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’

The first vase honors a Coral Delight camellia that burst in bloom Friday despite frigid temperatures.

Camellia x 'Coral Delight'

Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’

 

I cut the three semidouble flowers that were open and brought them indoors Saturday. By Sunday when I photographed them, they had faded significantly, but in a graceful, dignified way that I find compelling.

Camellia x 'Coral Delight'

Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’

 

Once again a cutting of Daphne odora fills out the vase.

Daphne odora (Winter daphne) and Camellia x 'Coral Delight'

Daphne odora (Winter daphne) and Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’

 

A second vase

In A Vase On Monday - Tiny Blooms

In A Vase On Monday – Tiny Blooms

It was 15°F Saturday night yet anemones were freshly budding when I went out early Sunday morning to check out the garden. The anemone stems were only two or three inches above the soil and their flowers were tiny, the size of my thumbnail.

Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’

Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’

Across the way a couple of undersized, misguided daffodil buds revealed their yellow petals. Daffodils have been very hesitant to open in this unpredictable weather. Usually by now many more would be open and the flowers would be much larger.

Narcissus 'King Alfred' (trumpet daffodil)

Narcissus ‘King Alfred’ (trumpet daffodil)

Together the anemones and daffodils were barely enough to form a miniature posy. For a bit of greenery I added the tip of a flowering Euphorbia ‘Shorty.’

In A Vase On Monday - Tiny Blooms

In A Vase On Monday – Tiny Blooms

I chose a vase with a fairly small neck, yet the flowers sink and are a bit overwhelmed by the size of the container (4.25 inches high x 2.25 inches wide).

A. coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’ is more lavender than these photographs portray. I experimented with a setting the color option on my camera to “vivid” and I like the resulting strong color, but the flower’s blue is overstated in these images.

In A Vase On Monday - Tiny Blooms

In A Vase On Monday – Tiny Blooms

Materials
Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’
Daphne odora (Winter daphne)

Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’
Anemone coronaria ‘The Bride
Euphorbia ‘Shorty’ (Shorty Spurge)
Narcissus ‘King Alfred’ (trumpet daffodil)

Thanks to Cathy for hosting this weekly flower arranging addiction. Visit her at Rambling In The Garden to discover what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday and feel free to join in.

Mid-February, Briefly Feeling Lucky

NC Botanical Garden

NC Botanical Garden

On Friday, to celebrate Darwin Day, my husband and I attended a lunchtime lecture entitled “The Evolution Of Biodiversity: History or Science” at the North Carolina Botanical Garden.

Charles Darwin, circa 1871, by Oscar Gustave Rejlander (1813-1875)

Charles Darwin, circa 1871, by Oscar Gustave Rejlander (1813-1875)

There were snow flurries during the talk but by the time we walked to the car only the cold remained.

We did not take time to explore the garden that day, but as we hurried back to the parking lot, we admired the light on the grasses fronting the parking spaces.

NC Botanical Garden

NC Botanical Garden

NC Botanical Garden

NC Botanical Garden

Upon returning home I noticed a camellia on the side of the house was blooming. It has been too cold. How is that possible? Well, the days are lengthening and, before it turned cold this week, it actually had been very warm.  Three flowers were open. Because of cold weather this camellia failed to bloom at all last winter. Tonight’s low is predicted to be 15°F.  Who is feeling lucky?

Camellia x 'Coral Delight'

Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’   Synonym: Camellia japonica x Camellia saluenensis

I have been taking this winter one day at a time. Even so, winter is passing by quickly. In a couple of weeks a friend and I will travel to Virginia for the hellebore festival at Pine Knot Farms.  Making plans around here in February is usually a sure-fire way to invite an ice storm into town, but definitely this year we are feeling lucky that we will make it.

Looking ahead, April is promising to be a great month. I already have tickets for some  Art In Bloom events at the North Carolina Museum of Art early in the month. The Chapel Hill Garden Club’s biennial spring garden tour takes place the last weekend in April, featuring seven private gardens. I am already signed up to be a garden guide at one of the gardens for the spring tour.

And, not everything special is a garden event. Also in April our daughter is coming to visit from the west coast.  March will be busy but I am feeling lucky.

Spring Arrives!

Though the sun later broke through, the early morning was cloudy and cold when I walked through the garden looking for blooms. Forecasts warn of lows near freezing tonight and temperatures will dip into the twenties later this week. But here it is, March 20, 2013, and today is the first day of spring. The vernal equinox occurred at 7:02 a.m. EDT.

The early blooms of Helleborus have been a highlight since the first week of January.

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

The garden is waking up but shows no sign of hurry. Among the several patches of Phlox subulata a lone flower is open.

Phlox subulata 'Emerald Cushion Blue'

Phlox subulata ‘Emerald Cushion Blue’

A few little Muscari flowers began blooming this week. These were planted over a decade ago and barely bloomed at all last year, so it is nice to see them again.

Muscari (Grape Hyacinth)

Muscari (Grape Hyacinth)

Diminutive white flowers are beginning to fill the branches of a Spiraea I brought from my previous garden.

Spiraea

Spiraea

Iberis Sempervirens filled the meditation circle last year but most of what was planted there has died out. I blamed moles but also realize the site may not drain well enough for this plant. Fortunately it is tucked around the garden in other spots, a cheery little plant.

Iberis Sempervirens (Candytuft)

Iberis Sempervirens (Candytuft)

Last fall I finally remembered to add a few more daffodils to the garden. Just opened today is the first flower of the miniature Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete.’ The garden was so overgrown when it was time to plant these bulbs, it was hard to find a good place for them. They were relegated to an old terra cotta pot, which worked out just fine.

Narcissus 'Tete-a-Tete' (Tete-a-Tete Daffodil)

Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’ (Tete-a-Tete Daffodil)

Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’ has been blooming beautifully for a few weeks. I love the milky white streak that marks these blossoms.

Camellia x 'Coral Delight'

Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’

Camellia x 'Coral Delight'

Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’

Happy Spring!

Hellebores And Mid-January Notes

Remembering that many plants were on an extremely early blooming cycle last year, I have been curious about what this year’s timing might be like for the garden.

For the last few weeks I have watched expectantly for the first Hellebores of the season and today I finally noticed an open flower.

Helleborus orientalis (Lenten rose)

Helleborus orientalis (Lenten rose)

Last winter (2011-2012) these hellebores bloomed very early, by December 30, 2011, whereas the winter before that (2010-2011) there were no blooms until several days after Valentine’s Day. So they are somewhere in-between this year.

I have never been bothered by the leaves on hellebores, but enthusiasts recommend pruning them before the buds begin forming to make it easier to enjoy the blossoms. Too late to do it properly but today I carefully trimmed away many of the lower, older leaves. They do look tidier after this cleanup.

Helleborus orientalis (Lenten rose)-2

Helleborus orientalis (Lenten rose)

Growing adjacent to the hellebores and full of buds is a winter blooming Camellia  x ‘Coral Delight.’

Camellia x 'Coral Delight'

Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’

The garden is saturated from recent rains. I was surprised to see moss growing along the northern side garden where the hellebores and the ‘Coral Delight’ are planted. The high temperature reached a fine 72°F this afternoon, well above the average 54°F for this time of year. The nice warm weather should stay through Monday so I hope to finally tackle some weeding chores I have been putting off.

My time in the garden was brief today, but I did take a few minutes to walk the labyrinth. As I stepped along the path I smiled to note how well the Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ has worked  to supply some year-round interest.

Penstemon digitalis 'Husker Red' (Beardtongue)

Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ (Beardtongue)