Tag Archives: Daphne odora

In A Vase On Monday—Pink And White

In A Vase On Monday - Pink And White

In A Vase On Monday – Pink And White

Monday brings the chance to share cut flowers from the garden by joining in Cathy’s weekly challenge In A Vase On Monday.

I am smitten by the beauty of anemones. For today’s offering a hand-painted Fenton Glass vase picks up the rose pink of Anemone coronaria ‘Harmony Orchid,’ a recent addition to the garden.   The white of A. coronaria ‘The Bride’ introduces movement and light.

In A Vase On Monday - Pink And White

In A Vase On Monday – Pink And White

Aesthetically, odd numbers work better, so one more anemone of either color might have improved the design, but there were no more to be found this week.

In A Vase On Monday - Pink And White

In A Vase On Monday – Pink And White

Dark green foliage and the pink and white flowers of Daphne odora fill out the arrangement.

Daphne odora provides dark foliage as well as pink and white accents

Daphne odora provides dark foliage as well as pink and white accents

Materials
Anemone coronaria ‘Harmony Orchid’
Anemone coronaria ‘The Bride’
Daphne odora (winter daphne)
Hand painted Fenton Glass vase

Anemone coronaria 'Harmony Orchid'

Anemone coronaria ‘Harmony Orchid’

Happy Leap Day!

Thanks to Cathy for hosting this weekly flower addiction. Visit her at Rambling In The Garden to discover what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday—Anemone Coronaria

In A Vase On Monday

In A Vase On Monday

Monday brings the chance to share cut flowers from the garden by joining in Cathy’s weekly challenge In A Vase On Monday.

In the garden on Saturday there were several anemones basking in sunlight. Anticipating their usefulness for today’s vase I brought them indoors early to condition.

Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’

Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’ in the garden Saturday

By Sunday morning violet blue ‘Mr. Fokker’ had opened completely and its white counterpart, ‘The Bride,’ was nearly so.

In A Vase On Monday - From Above

In A Vase On Monday – From Above

Anemone coronaria ‘Bride’ and ‘Mr. Fokker’

Anemone coronaria ‘Bride’ and ‘Mr. Fokker’

Anemone coronaria ‘Bride’ and ‘Mr. Fokker’

Anemone coronaria ‘Bride’ and ‘Mr. Fokker’

The poppy-like anemone flowers are not in pristine condition, the weather has been too harsh.

On the other hand Winter daphne, which did not bloom at all last year due to cold weather, has been magnificent this season.  A trio of branches form the foundation of today’s arrangement, holding the anemones in place without need for other mechanics. Daphne contributes rich dark green foliage and also delicate clusters of pink buds that turn white upon opening.

Daphne odora (Winter daphne) and Anemone coronaria

Daphne odora (Winter daphne) and Anemone coronaria

A gift from a friend, this Monday’s container is a high-gloss glazed mug from M.L. Owens Pottery, Seagrove, NC, circa 1975-76.

Initially I chose to use the mug because its size  (4 inches high by 3.25 inches in diameter) seemed perfect for the amount of materials I had collected. In the end I feel it is the vase’s strong color that completes the arrangement.  Vibrant and dramatic, the shiny red is a bold match for the pure hues of the anemones.

Red Seagrove Pottery Mug

Red Seagrove Pottery Mug

Materials
Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’
Anemone coronaria ‘The Bride’
Daphne odora (Winter daphne)
Glazed red mug (M.L. Owens Pottery, Seagrove, NC, circa 1975-76)

Anemone coronaria ‘Bride’ and ‘Mr. Fokker’

Anemone coronaria ‘Bride’ and ‘Mr. Fokker’

I am grateful to Cathy for hosting this weekly flower addiction. Visit her at Rambling In The Garden to discover what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday and feel free to join in.

Happy New Year 2016

Daphne odora (Winter daphne)

Daphne odora (Winter daphne)

As one year concludes and the next slips in, I want to thank you for visiting with me at pbmGarden.

That I can share my little garden with you brings me great pleasure. To have you stop by and share a bit of yourselves brings me sheer delight.

Best wishes for the new year. May you easily find your way.

Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’ and 'Bride'

Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’ and ‘Bride’

Tulip and Daphne Updates

Tulips - Day 15

Tulips – Day 15

On February 26 I began an experiment to force some tulip bulbs that had been chilling in my refrigerator drawer for 6-7 weeks. I checked and measured the bulbs’ progress this morning.

Tulip Bulbs Developed Healthy Roots

Tulip Bulbs Developed Healthy Roots

 

There are 6 Endless Spring Orange Blend and 3 Persian Pearl. All are actively growing and have developed good roots. One in particular is teacher’s pet, having reached up 7.5 inches.

Forced Tulips - Day 15

Forced Tulips – Day 15

I still intend to follow up on the advice I received to add more rocks and provide a framework to support the bulbs; time just slipped away. The container has been in a cool, fairly dark room for 15 days. I think it might be time to bring it out into the light.

My concerns about the Daphne odora (Winter daphne) were mostly unfounded. Although the shrubs certainly were damaged and browned by the severe cold weather in February, the flowers survived. This week every time I open my front door the sweet lemony fragrance makes me smile and breathe deeply.

Daphne odora 'Aureomarginata' (Winter daphne)

Daphne odora ‘Aureomarginata’ (Winter daphne)

Daphne odora 'Aureomarginata' (Winter daphne)

Daphne odora ‘Aureomarginata’ (Winter daphne)

In A Vase On Monday—Once Upon A Time

In A Vase On Monday - Once Upon A Time

In A Vase On Monday – Once Upon A Time

Monday brings an opportunity to practice flower arranging by joining in Cathy’s weekly challenge In A Vase On Monday to fill a vase using materials gathered in one’s own garden.

It was cold the past week—9 degrees F. (-12.7 C.) one morning—and naturally the garden took it pretty hard to learn it really is winter. Helleborus had begun blooming in time to incorporate into my Monday vase last week, but I was unable to collect fresh ones this time. They looked limp and it seemed best not to disturb them. Fortunately I was able to reuse a couple from last week’s vase for today.

I looked in vain for anything else blooming. Instead I cut some Daphne odora branches filled with tightly closed, yet colorful, dark pink buds. Its variegated foliage looked surprisingly fresh and bright.

Daphne odora 'Aureomarginata' (Winter daphne)

Daphne odora ‘Aureomarginata’ (Winter daphne)

For color, charm and sheer nostalgia I selected my daughter’s small Peter Rabbit cup to hold today’s arrangement. Once upon a time she used this little Wedgwood mug at every meal.

Peter Rabbit Cup, England

Peter Rabbit Cup, England

The teacup design on the napkin underneath was chosen for the way it echoes the colors of the fresh materials and the Beatrix Potter characters. A few sprigs of dark green cypress foliage were included for extra texture.

Peter Rabbit Cup, England

Peter Rabbit Cup, England

Materials List

Daphne odora ‘Aureomarginata’ (Winter daphne)
Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)
Cypress, species unknown

Now run along and don’t get into any mischief

Daphne odora 'Aureomarginata' (Winter daphne)

Daphne odora ‘Aureomarginata’ (Winter daphne)

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting. Please visit her to see what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday—Four Seasons

 

In A Vase On Monday - Four Seasons

In A Vase On Monday – Four Seasons

Today’s “Four Seasons” refers to the annual cycle in the garden as this week marks the first year anniversary for Cathy’s weekly challenge called In A Vase On Monday. During the past year Cathy has inspired quite a few fellow garden bloggers to create fresh arrangements each Monday using materials found in our gardens.

I first joined Cathy’s Monday vase project on January 27, 2014, and since then I have been looking forward to seeing everyone’s creations each week. The vases have been delightful and the resulting sense of sharing and community has been gratifying. Thanks to Cathy for hosting and congratulations.

Lagerstroemia (Crape Myrtle) and Daphne odora 'Aureomarginata' (Winter daphne) Foliage

Lagerstroemia (Crape Myrtle) and Daphne odora ‘Aureomarginata’ (Winter daphne) Foliage

Winter:  Daphne odora ‘Aureomarginata’ (Winter daphne) was featured last winter in my first Monday vase. Today I used some of the green foliage for concealer leaves.

Spring:  Clematis ‘Jackmanii’ is a spring favorite and has rebloomed for the past month.

Summer:  Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower) and Cleome hassleriana (Spider Flower) are mainstays of my summer garden.

Fall:  Lagerstroemia (Crape Myrtle) has compelling orange fall foliage color.

Flowers and foliage representing four seasons of gardening

Materials

Flowers
Achillea filipendulina (Fern-leaf Yarrow)
Clematis ‘Jackmanii’
Cleome hassleriana (Spider Flower)
Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)
Lavender
Perovskia atriplicifolia (Russian Sage)
Verbena bonariensis (Tall Verbena)

Foliage
Daphne odora ‘Aureomarginata’ (Winter daphne)
Lagerstroemia (Crape Myrtle)

Mechanics
3 Round Ikebana Kenzan Flower (Frog) Pin Holders
Large round black plastic dish

 

Clematis 'Jackmanii'

Clematis ‘Jackmanii’

Thanks again to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting. Discover what delightful things she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday. Perhaps you will be inspired to share your own vase.

Garden Bloggers Foliage Day – September 2014

Callicarpa americana (American beautyberry)

Callicarpa americana (American beautyberry)

The first day of autumn coincides with Garden Bloggers Foliage Day (GBFD).  The countryside and the garden remain fairly green—very little autumnal leaf color so far. As one sign of the season, stems of the native Callicarpa americana (American beautyberry) are covered in purply ripened berries.

In the Northern Hemisphere the fall season arrives today with the occurrence of the autumnal equinox, September 22 at 10:29 p.m. EDT. It was almost 90°F yesterday, but now at 5:00 p.m. it is a pleasant 71°F. The rest of the week should remain in the seventies during the day, dropping into the 50s at night.

There was a surprise shower overnight, not enough to fill the bird baths but any amount is needed and welcome. A few drops remained on this Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine), decorated with bits of red as it transitions toward fall.

Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

Strange as it seems, last week I could detect the fragrance of Winter Daphne. Three of these lovely shrubs serve as hedge at the front of our house.

Daphne odora 'Aureomarginata' (Winter daphne)

Daphne odora ‘Aureomarginata’ (Winter daphne)

Along the northern side yard camellias, gardenias and hellebores add green interest. The camellias are gaining fat buds that will open in another month to six weeks.  The gardenias in this position look healthy, more so than others in the back garden. Stationed nearby Hellebores are full of strong, deep green leaves.

Gardenia and Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Gardenia and Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

For several years I have been monitoring the progress of a small passalong Sarcococca ruscifolia (Fragrant Sweet Box). It requires full shade which is hard to find in my garden. I planted it underneath one of the corner ‘Carolina Sapphire’ Arizona Cypress specimens, where it receives scant early morning sunlight. The plant remains very small but the foliage look great this year.

Sarcococca ruscifolia (Fragrant Sweet Box)

Sarcococca ruscifolia (Fragrant Sweet Box)

Sarcococca ruscifolia (Fragrant Sweet Box)

Sarcococca ruscifolia (Fragrant Sweet Box)

The only featured grass in my garden is Muhlenbergia capillaris (Pink Muhly Grass). Despite it  not being very well situated, this year it looks very nice.

Muhlenbergia capillaris (Pink Muhly Grass)

Muhlenbergia capillaris (Pink Muhly Grass)

A big thank you to Christina at Creating my own garden of the Hesperides for hosting GBFD on the 22nd of each month.