Tag Archives: gardenia

In A Vase On Monday—Gardenia And Company

In A Vase On Monday

In A Vase On Monday

Monday again!  Time to join Cathy with In A Vase On Monday to share an arrangement using materials gathered from the garden.

I chose a black triangular vase this week to highlight three surprise gardenias I found yesterday blooming along the north side of the house. The gardenia’s sweet fragrance is difficult to adequately describe, but is as luscious as its pure white petals.

Gardenia jasminoides

Gardenia jasminoides

Relentless heat and lack of rain has characterized our weather the past month and as a result a mid-summer planting of gladiolas has failed. The plants looked strong and promising during July and I was looking forward to using them arrangements. But August sered the leaves and stunted the blooms.  I salvaged just a portion of one to use with the gardenias today.

Gladiolus

Gladiolus

There are more zinnias included this week. One of the few flowers able to withstand the recent  temperatures, even their foliage is looking distressed.

Cactus Zinnia

Cactus Zinnia

When gathering flowers for today’s vase I also found a single stem of perennial sweet pea that looked fresh enough to include. Though the bloom is non-scented, the twining tendrils of this passalong add extra texture to the design.

In A Vase On Monday

In A Vase On Monday

Materials
Gardenia jasminoides
Gladiolus
Lathyrus latifolius (Perennial Sweet Pea)
Zinnia ‘Cut and Come Again Mix’ (Burpee, popular cutting variety, 24” H)
Zinnia ‘Burpeeana Giants Mix’ (Burpee, colorful huge 6’ Blooms, 24” H)
Zinnia elegans ’Cactus Flower Blend’ (Botanical Interests, 4-6” wide, 2-3’H. Heirloom Twist and shout. Double and semi-double)
Porcelain Ikebana vases, Georgetown Pottery, Maine. Triangle Black Wave (6.5 W x 6.5 L x 2H)

It is always such a pleasure to put together a weekly vase. Thanks to Cathy for hosting and giving us a chance to express our flower arranging passion. Visit her at Rambling In The Garden to discover what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday—Gardenias With Blue And Red

In A Vase On Monday—Gardenias With Blue And Red

In A Vase On Monday—Gardenias With Blue And Red

On this Memorial Day I am joining Cathy’s  In A Vase On Monday, a weekly opportunity to share cut flowers from one’s garden.

Gardenias grow 7 or 8 feet tall along the north side of our house. They began blooming this past week and their first fresh, fragrant blossoms were a clear choice for today’s arrangement.

Gardenia sp.

Gardenia sp.

Gardenias

Gardenias

Companions for the gardenias are deep red antirrhinum and Black and Blue salvia.

In A Vase On Monday—Gardenias With Blue And Red

In A Vase On Monday—Gardenias With Blue And Red

In A Vase On Monday—Gardenias With Blue And Red

In A Vase On Monday—Gardenias With Blue And Red

The vase for today belonged to a special neighbor and friend who passed away last year. A brilliant, well-travelled and well-read woman, Linda had a warm smile for everyone, an unforgettable laugh and a fascinating story for every occasion. From time to time I helped her with technical issues with her no longer extant WordPress blog. On her blog she interspersed recordings of her daily life in Chapel Hill as a writer, with accounts of experiences growing up in Seattle and her time overseas as an American Foreign Service spouse where one of her official duties in 1990 was to greet Pope John Paul II during his tour of Africa. Among many things, we shared a penchant for Ann Patchett novels and anything related to Julia Child. A few years older than I, she kindly took me under her wing a bit, which was touching. I am grateful to have this lovely keepsake of our friendship.

As befitting its former owner, the vessel holding today’s flowers is unique. Made of blown glass, the form is asymmetrical with alternating bands of blue and green color. The top is loosely pinched together leaving just a small narrow opening, yet it accommodated quite a few stems.

In A Vase On Monday—Gardenias With Blue And Red

In A Vase On Monday—Gardenias With Blue And Red

Materials

Antirrhinum majus (snapdragon)
Gardenia sp.
Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue’

In A Vase On Monday—Gardenias With Blue And Red

In A Vase On Monday—Gardenias With Blue And Red

As always, thanks to Cathy for hosting this weekly flower obsession. Visit her at Rambling In The Garden to discover what she and other gardeners are placing In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday—Featuring Gardenias

Trio of Vases - Overhead View

Trio of Vases – Overhead View

Trio of Vases - Overhead View (B&W)

Trio of Vases – Overhead View (B&W)

Monday brings the chance to practice flower arranging by joining in Cathy’s weekly challenge In A Vase On Monday, where the goal is simply to fill a vase using materials gathered in one’s own garden.

Yesterday I gathered a variety of flowers and foliage and placed them into glasses of warm water for conditioning. There were Zinnias, Dahlias, Perovskia, Lantana, Pink Muhly Grass, even a single, long-awaited Cosmos.

But of these, only a few of the Zinnias made it into this week’s arrangement. I never finished working with most of the flowers I collected, but did complete a trio of vases—two small and one large ceramic containers.

Trio of Vases

Trio of Vases

The prized blooms this week are gardenias from bushes on the north side of the house. Their fragrant, waxy white flowers and deep green leaves are the main focus for the large vase, accentuated by a few boldly colored zinnias.

Gardenias and Zinnias

Gardenias and Zinnias

Gardenia sp.

Gardenia sp.

 

In one of the small vases are an Echinacea ‘Big Sky Sundown,’ a gardenia with greenery and several sprigs of Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue.’

Black and Blue and Sundown

Black and Blue and Sundown

In the other small green vase are five pink and orange Zinnias, simply arranged.

Vase of Pink and Orange Zinnias

Vase of Pink and Orange Zinnias

The vases were interesting to photograph from above. I seldom include props but today I used one of several pieces of decorative molding salvaged from my father’s cabinet shop to play with the composition of the largest vase. (I had planned to use this molding with last week’s orchid but as it turned out it detracted from the integrity of the flower. Here it just is used to add weight to the bottom of the composition.)

Doecorative Molding

Decorative Molding

Gardenias and Zinnias - Overhead View

Large Vase – Gardenias and Zinnias – Overhead View

Large Vase - Gardenias and Zinnias

Large Vase – Gardenias and Zinnias

I like the black and white version of the last image.

Large Vase - Gardenias and Zinnias (B&W)

Large Vase – Gardenias and Zinnias (B&W)

Materials
Echinacea ‘Big Sky Sundown’ (Hybrid Coneflower)
Gardenia sp.
Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue’
Zinnia

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting. Discover what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday and feel free to join in.

In A Vase On Monday—Red On Red

Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm)

Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm)

Each Monday brings opportunity to practice flower arranging by joining in Cathy’s weekly challenge In A Vase On Monday. The goal is to fill a vase using materials gathered in one’s own garden.

I had hoped to feature gardenias this week, but they are in very poor condition this year. None were pristine, most were brown, but I managed to find just a single usable bloom. Fortunately Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm) is just coming into flower this week and I was able to incorporate a flowing arc of red into this week’s arrangement. Glossy green leaves of Camellia sasanqua and silvery branches of lavender complete the design.

Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm) and Gardenia

Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm) and Gardenia

The red and black raku pot used to hold the flowers is one of several I have collected by Charles Chrisco, who grew up in the Seagrove/Jugtown area of North Carolina where there is a rich  history of traditional pottery making.

Materials
Outline foliage: Camellia sasanqua
Round focal flower: Gardenia jasminoides
Filler foliage: Lavandula x intermedia ‘Dutch’ (Dutch Lavender)
Outline flowers: Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm)

Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm)

Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm)

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting. I encourage you to visit her to learn what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday.

June Fragrance

Gardenia jasminoides 'Chuck Hayes'

Gardenia jasminoides ‘Chuck Hayes’

The lusciously sweet scent of gardenia is back in the garden.

The western border against the fence, planted with Gardenia jasminoides ‘Chuck Hayes,’  is beginning to fill with creamy rich blossoms.

Gardenia jasminoides 'Chuck Hayes'

Gardenia jasminoides ‘Chuck Hayes’

This Chuck Hayes hedge bloomed earlier last year, by May 23, but since everything was early last year, I checked my records back another year. In 2011 the date was June 4.

The mature size of this hardy evergreen is 3-6 feet in height and width. In this garden those in more sun are approaching the 6-foot mark while those situated under more shade are 3-4-feet.  This year’s abundant rain was perfect for keeping these plants looking healthy.

Gardenia jasminoides 'Chuck Hayes'

Gardenia jasminoides ‘Chuck Hayes’

Two gardenias of unknown species are in full bloom today along the northern side of the house as well.

Gardenia jasminoides sp.

Gardenia jasminoides sp.

Gardenia jasminoides sp.

Gardenia jasminoides sp.

 

These 8-foot shrubs were rooted by a dear friend and former next-door-neighbor.  Across the driveway sits the gardenia she planted when she lived there. It is still growing strong, but ironically it has not begun blooming yet this season.

This gardenia’s individual blossoms look so compelling, it was impossible to select one representative image.

Gardenia jasminoides sp.

Gardenia jasminoides sp.

Gardenia jasminoides sp.

Gardenia jasminoides sp.

Gardenia jasminoides sp.

Gardenia jasminoides sp.

Gardenia jasminoides sp.

Gardenia jasminoides sp.

I brought some flowers into the house to enjoy and the gardenia scent is delightful.

Note
Five Gardenia jasminoides ‘August Beauty’ (Gardenia) planted last year to screen the heating/air conditioning units are disappointing so far.  They are barely hanging on, showing yellowing leaves and little growth.

Garden Bloggers Foliage Day – September 2012

Each month Garden Bloggers Foliage Day (GBFD), hosted by Christina of Creating My Own Garden of the Hesperides, is an opportunity to examine the contributions of foliage in one’s garden.  It is 83F this afternoon, the first day of autumn, sunny with a gentle breeze.

Primed to focus on foliage I started out walking around the front of the house this morning where glossy leaves of Daphne odora ‘Aureomarginata’ (Winter daphne) shone in the early light. The anomaly of red-tinged buds was an unexpected sight.

Daphne odora ‘Aureomarginata’ (Winter daphne)

Along the north side of the house is a very narrow strip separating our property from the neighbors’ drive. Planted at the northeast corner of the house is a Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’ and just beyond are several gardenias (variety unknown) that have bloomed well this year.

Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’

Both the camellia and the gardenia are trouble-free but do require some light pruning to keep from extending into the neighbors’ driveway. I had to trim them last month which I think stimulated this new growth on the Sasanqua.

New Growth On Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’

Listed variously as fall-blooming and winter-blooming, this Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’ bloomed last year by November 1.

Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’

A friend rooted the gardenias that grow here now and presented them to me when they were just six or eight inches tall about ten years ago. This view is looking west toward the main garden.

Gardenia in Northern Border

Both the camellia and the gardenias are evergreen with nice glossy leaves.  These shrubs serve to hide utility units from the street, but flowers, such as this creamy Gardenia flower, are a bonus.

Gardenia Flower in Northern Border

Next to the gardenias is a grouping of Helleborus orientalis (Lenten rose) which add deep green color and texture now and will enliven this area in winter and spring when they bloom.

Helleborus orientalis (Lenten rose)

Moving down beyond the Hellebores the rest of the north side strip is planted mostly with Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine) and Aegopodium podagraria(bishop’s weed) that took over. The Aegopodium can be invasive and I have planned for several years to remove it. It will die back in the winter.

Narrow Property Strip

The reddened leaves of Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine) suggest a sense of autumn.

Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

This variegated Aegopodium is a shade-loving ground cover.

Aegopodium podagraria(bishop’s weed)

Flowering Dogwoods are native here but this is not a good example of one. It turned brown during a three-week dry spell in July and never recovered. Flowering dogwoods usually have beautiful red foliage in the fall.

Cornus florida (Flowering Dogwood)

The dogwood is setting fruit.

Cornus florida (Flowering Dogwood) Fruit

In front of the house near the street the Crape Myrtle that was blown over in July is rallying.  I was unable to match the variety reliably for a replacement so decided to see how it works out to let the tree recover on its own.  There are utility lines nearby so this is the easiest and least expensive approach.

Crape Myrtle

Crape Myrtle

Thanks to Christina for hosting this look at foliage.  For inspiration visit her at Creating My Own Garden of the Hesperides where you can find links to other Garden Bloggers Foliage Day entries.