Tag Archives: Rudbeckia hirta ‘Irish Eyes’

Garden Bloggers Foliage Day – April 2017

Today is Garden Bloggers Foliage Day (GBFD), hosted by Christina at Garden of the Hesperides. It’s been too busy around my house the past few months to blog regularly as my husband recovers from surgeries. (He is doing well and continues to get physical therapy to help him regain strength.)

But today I planned to join Christina in looking at the part foliage plays around the garden and as there still are a few hours before the day ends, here goes. I refuse to show a photo of the Italian cypress, one of three planted last fall, mown down in its youth by voles. [I discovered it simply leaning over the other day. How I wish there were an easy and practical solution for controlling those creatures]. So, here is more interesting foliage that caught my eye this week.

Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ (Beardtongue) is looking great in the meditation circle.

Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ (Beardtongue)

Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’  (Lil’ Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea) took several years to get established but is looking strong this spring.

Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’ (Lil’ Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea)

The soft silvery mound formed by Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ foliage is appealing in springtime.

Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ (Wormwood)

Rudbeckia hirta ‘Irish Eyes’ at the southern side path entrance has tripled itself. Although it looks fine here alongside this Asclepias, it will soon tower 6 feet.

Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower) and Asclepias tuberosa (Butterfly Plant)

This little beauty is Itea virginica ‘Sprich’ LITTLE HENRY (Virginia sweetspire). It was planted last fall (along with the fateful cypress vole fodder.) I have admired this shrub on other blogs and am looking forward to having it in my garden.

Itea virginica ‘Sprich’ LITTLE HENRY (Virginia sweetspire)

Shasta daisies have helped themselves to an entire border. I push back occasionally and pass along plants to friends, but the foliage is evergreen and in summer the flowers will be welcome, so for the most part I just enjoy them.

Leucanthemum x superbum (Shasta Daisy)

Visit Christina at Garden of the Hesperides for a look around her remarkable Italian garden and find links to foliage perspectives from many parts of the world.

Correcting A Case Of Mistaken Identity

The plant in question blooming 7-14-2006

The plant in question blooming 7-14-2006

For August Garden Bloggers Foliage Day (GBFD) I highlighted the foliage of a plant that I have grown for years. As it happens I have been referring to it mistakenly as Rudbeckia hirta ‘Irish Eyes.’  Seen above on July 14, 2006 with yellow flowers, this is the plant in question. I cannot be sure but the plant looks fairly well established, not newly added.

Then here is a photograph of a plant label, taken the following day, that is the likely source of the mixup. How or why the confusion I can only guess, but apparently the real ‘Irish Eyes’ did not survive.

Plant tag for Rudbeckia hirta 'Irish Eyes' 7-15-2006

Plant tag for Rudbeckia hirta ‘Irish Eyes’ 7-15-2006

Fortunately Tammy at casa mariposa shared the actual name of my plant and I am very grateful to her for helping me correct the identification. This native perennial wildflower actually is Rudbeckia laciniata (Wild Golden Glow or Greenheaded Coneflower).

Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower)

Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower)

Tammy noted, “The hirtas have furry oval leaves and are much shorter.”  My rudbeckia has deeply lobed and coarsely serrated lower leaves, not furry, oval ones, and whereas R. hirta ‘Irish Eyes’ is 30 inches tall,  R. laciniata ranges in height from 3 to 12 feet (mine is closer to 6 feet).

So thanks Tammy! I am happy to know the true identity of this Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower) and clarify it for my readers.

Since foliage is not the main focus today, I will share a few images of the blooms. A few years ago a piece of the original broke off with a bit of root attached so I planted it in a spot just outside the garden gate. All sorts of insects are drawn to the nectar and American goldfinches love the seeds.

American goldfinch enjoying seeds of Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower)

American goldfinch (upper right) enjoying seeds of Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower)

Before opening the yellow ray flowers curve up around the yellow-green cone.

Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower)

Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower)

As the blossom matures the rays droop back and downward.

Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower)

Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower)

It is interesting to see the seeds forming.

Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower)

Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower)

Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower)

Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower)

Ok, from now on it is Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower).

Garden Bloggers Foliage Day – August 2015

Betula nigra (River Birch)

Betula nigra (River Birch)

Christina at Creating my own garden of the Hesperides hosts GBFD on the 22nd of each month to highlight the importance of foliage in our gardens. The past week has been unusually busy with little time for the garden so Garden Bloggers Foliage Day (GBFD) sneaked up on me this month.

In a side garden along the front drive Asclepias tuberosa (Butterfly weed ) has formed long okra-like seed pods. There are two other Asclepius tuberosa in the main garden, but neither has formed the pods.  I cannot find a label for the shrub in the background—some kind of slow-grower, a juniper I think. Visible in the upper left corner is a Betula nigra (River Birch) that grows at the street just on the edge of our property.

Asclepias tuberosa (Butterfly Plant)

Asclepias tuberosa (Butterfly Plant)

I like the river birch. It began dropping leaves very early this summer because of the drought. The shaggy cinnamon-red bark is characteristic of this native tree.

Bark of native tree Betula nigra (River Birch)

Bark of native tree Betula nigra (River Birch)

By the way a week ago in another part of the garden I saw my first Monarch(s) of the year. I usually see them in October here. Without a camera on two consecutive days, I watched one nectaring on remnant flowers of a Rudbeckia hirta ‘Irish Eyes.’ There is something special about seeing the Monarchs that raises a feeling of gladness and appreciation.

I was recently complaining about how that Rudbeckia had been knocked over in a storm and needed to be cut back, but now I think I will leave it a bit longer.  A child of that one, the ‘Irish Eyes’ below is in the side garden just at the gate. It splayed over also after the same storm, but I managed to tie it up. It is not blooming much now but the foliage is still looking healthy. It received some extra water this summer because I was filling a nearby bird bath almost daily. In the background the river birch is visible again.

Rudbeckia hirta 'Irish Eyes'

Rudbeckia hirta ‘Irish Eyes’

Silvery Dusty Miller has spread with wild abandon in the western border. It is easy to pull out when I finally decide “Enough,” so I let it roam this summer. It is not as attractive when it flowers so it is time to clip it back. Euphorbia ‘Ascot Rainbow’ is new this year. Fresh new leaves of Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine) add softness to this area.

Euphorbia 'Ascot Rainbow' (Ascot Rainbow Spurge) and Dusty Miller

Euphorbia ‘Ascot Rainbow’ (Ascot Rainbow Spurge) and Dusty Miller

Thanks to Christina for hosting. Be sure to visit her to see her featured foliage and find links to other foliage highlights of other GBFD bloggers.

Garden Bloggers Foliage Day – May 2015

Liatris spicata 'Floristan Weiss' (Gayfeather)

Liatris spicata ‘Floristan Weiss’ (Gayfeather)

Time again for Garden Bloggers Foliage Day (GBFD), hosted by Christina at Garden of the Hesperides.

This very hot, dry May has been a tough month for the garden. A sprinkling of rain on Thursday brought scarcely enough drops to acknowledge. Temperatures at least are cooler and the weekend is forecast to be sunny and beautiful.

Trying to make a positive comment as she walked along the borders the other day, one honest neighbor suggested, “I bet this was really beautiful last week.”  Indeed the garden is moving past is best for this year, but there are a few places where May foliage stands out. Any water droplets on the leaves are probably from nearly daily hand waterings.

I like the loose feathery texture of Liatris spicata ‘Floristan Weiss’ (Gayfeather).  Two of these planted in the northwest corner this year they are beginning form flower spikes.

Liatris spicata 'Floristan Weiss' (Gayfeather)

Liatris spicata ‘Floristan Weiss’ (Gayfeather)

There is a mostly sunny garden, but I protect a few shade-loving plants by situating them under a large juniper in the southwest corner. Heuchera, Hellebore, Brunnera, Phlox divaricata. Tansy, with its ferny foliage, prefers full sun, but underground rhizomes keep it spreading into this area anyway. Similarly, it seems Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue,’ which can take sun or part shade, is spreading in close around the silver-leaved Brunnera.

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose), Brunnera macrophylla ‘Silver Heart’ (False Forget-Me-Not)

Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose), Brunnera macrophylla ‘Silver Heart’ (False Forget-Me-Not)

Heuchera villosa 'Big Top Bronze' (Coral Bells)

Heuchera villosa ‘Big Top Bronze’ (Coral Bells)

Also in this area is a pass-along Sarcococca ruscifolia (Fragrant Sweet Box), which after several years now is still very tiny. I look forward to its fragrance when it decides the time has come to bloom.

Sarcococca ruscifolia (Fragrant Sweet Box)

Sarcococca ruscifolia (Fragrant Sweet Box)

Aucuba japonica ‘Variegata’ (Gold Dust Aucuba) was added in spring and has adapted well. It may soon get too large for its location but I purchased it because its foliage is nice for flower arrangements, not actually because I had the appropriate space.

Aucuba japonica 'Variegata' (Gold Dust Aucuba)

Aucuba japonica ‘Variegata’ (Gold Dust Aucuba)

Moving down into the southern border Daylilies and Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ make a nice paring. Rudbeckia fulgida (Orange Coneflower) nestled under the artemisia by its own desire.

Daylily, Artemisia 'Powis Castle' (Wormwood), Rudbeckia fulgida (Orange Coneflower)

Daylily, Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ (Wormwood), Rudbeckia fulgida (Orange Coneflower)

Artemisia 'Powis Castle' (Wormwood)

Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ (Wormwood)

A spring addition to the garden Camellia x ‘Koto-no-kaori’ shows some yellowing of foliage, but seems to be settling in well along the back fence of the western border.

Camellia x 'Koto-no-kaori'

Camellia x ‘Koto-no-kaori’

Nearby, Gardenia jasminoides ‘Frost Proof’ looks happy also and seems poised to bloom.

Gardenia jasminoides 'Frost Proof' (Gardenia 'Frost Proof')

Gardenia jasminoides ‘Frost Proof’ (Gardenia ‘Frost Proof’)

Dusty Miller makes a nice ground cover that spreads itself around easily, but is easy to pull out.

Dusty Miller

Dusty Miller

The exact name of this passalong is a source of curiosity. I have not been able to identify it definitely. Christina once suggested it could be simply a fine-leaved artemisia. Someone else suggested Jacobaea maritima (Silver Ragwort) formerly Senecio cineraria. That one looks more like one that is commonly sold as an annual around here. Whatever the name, at this time of year it looks its best,  whether forming a large patch of silver or photobombing a new-this-spring Euphorbia ‘Ascot Rainbow.’

Dusty Miller

Dusty Miller

Euphorbia 'Ascot Rainbow'  (Ascot Rainbow Spurge) and Dusty Miller

Euphorbia ‘Ascot Rainbow’ (Ascot Rainbow Spurge) and Dusty Miller

Maybe hundreds of Cleome hassleriana (Spider Flower) volunteers are vying for a spot in the garden.

Volunteers of Cleome hassleriana (Spider Flower)

Volunteers of Cleome hassleriana (Spider Flower)

Anemone coronaria provided a huge boost of color in early spring. I have not quite known what to do with them now so have just been letting them die back. One of two flowers still pop up, but mostly the seed heads are are providing the interest.

Anemone coronaria seedheads

Anemone coronaria seedheads

Anemone coronaria seedheads

Anemone coronaria seedheads

Two large specimens of Rudbeckia hirta ‘Irish Eyes’ are zipping upward and outward. This one is against the fence in the western border. Another one fills a corner at the southern side path entrance.

Rudbeckia hirta 'Irish Eyes'

Rudbeckia hirta ‘Irish Eyes’

Visit Christina at Garden of the Hesperides for a look around her Italian garden and find links to foliage perspectives from many parts of the world.

In A Vase On Monday—August Mingle (Take Two)

In A Vase On Monday - August Mingle

In A Vase On Monday – August Mingle

Yesterday’s In A Vase On Monday was completed too late to photograph the flowers in natural light. This afternoon I set up the arrangement on the sunny back porch and made a few more images.

I wanted to include them today for my own record because the colors are so much more vibrant and truer to life than I was able to capture indoors last night under artificial light. The rich hues of Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue’ are especially more obvious and in general, the natural light makes it much easier to see all of the flowers in detail.

Zinnia, Rudbeckia and Echinacea ‘Big Sky Sundown’ (Hybrid Coneflower)

Zinnia, Rudbeckia and Echinacea ‘Big Sky Sundown’ (Hybrid Coneflower)

In A Vase On Monday - August Mingle

In A Vase On Monday – August Mingle

In A Vase On Monday - August Mingle

In A Vase On Monday – August Mingle

Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue’

Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue’

Zinnia, Rudbeckia and Echinacea ‘Big Sky Sundown’ (Hybrid Coneflower)

Zinnia, Rudbeckia and Echinacea ‘Big Sky Sundown’ (Hybrid Coneflower)

Orange Zinnia Cut and Come Again

Orange Zinnia Cut and Come Again

Lantana camara (Common lantana) and  Orange Zinnia Cut and Come Again

Lantana camara (Common lantana) and Orange Zinnia Cut and Come Again

Rudbeckia hirta ‘Irish Eyes’

Rudbeckia hirta ‘Irish Eyes’

Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue’ and Yellow Zinnia Giant Flowered

Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue’ and Yellow Zinnia Giant Flowered

Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue’ , Yellow Zinnia Giant Flowered and Echinacea ‘Big Sky Sundown’ (Hybrid Coneflower)

Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue’ , Yellow Zinnia Giant Flowered and Echinacea ‘Big Sky Sundown’ (Hybrid Coneflower)

In A Vase On Monday - August Mingle

In A Vase On Monday – August Mingle

Materials
Lavandula x intermedia ‘Dutch’ (Dutch Lavender)
Heuchera villosa ‘Big Top Bronze’ (Coral Bells)
Euphorbia ‘Blackbird’ (Spurge)
Tanacetum vulgare (Tansy)
Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue’
Pale yellow and orange Zinnia Cut and Come Again Mix -Burpee- 24” height
Canary yellow Zinnia Giant Flowered -Burpee-30” height  Huge 5” blooms
Echinacea ‘Big Sky Sundown’ (Hybrid Coneflower)
Rosa ‘Iceberg’
Rudbeckia hirta ‘Irish Eyes’
Lantana camara (Common lantana)
Physostegia virginiana (Obedient plant)

In A Vase On Monday—August Mingle

In A Vase On Monday--August Mingle

In A Vase On Monday–August Mingle

Monday is nearly over, but I have been hurrying this evening to join Cathy’s challenge In A Vase On Monday. The goal is to fill a vase using materials gathered in one’s own garden.

In between errands and rain showers I finally managed at midday to gather flowers for today’s vase, leaving them in water to condition.  After dinner at last I had a few minutes to assemble an arrangement for today. Fortunately it went together quickly.

First I affixed florist oasis to a shallow dish. Using a single stalk of euphorbia and multiple stems of Coral Bell flowers and lavender leaves, I outlined a basic circular shape for the design. It would have been nice to have some concealer leaves, but it was too late to gather any. I made do with a few fern-like tansy leaves and a bit of the lavender.

Outlining the arrangement

Outlining the arrangement

Next I emphasized the outline using Black and Blue salvia, then added rich canary yellow giant zinnias for focal flowers. The salvia is actually very blue, not purple as the photograph makes it seem.

Next Black and Blue Salvia and Yellow Zinnias were added.

Next Black and Blue Salvia and Yellow Zinnias were added.

Echinacea ‘Big Sky Sundown’ (Hybrid Coneflower)

Echinacea ‘Big Sky Sundown’ (Hybrid Coneflower)

Then came red-orange coneflowers (Echinacea ‘Big Sky Sundown’), orange zinnias, and lantana. The lantana seems mostly orange at first glance, but its blooms are actually multi-hued clusters of orange, yellow, and pink flowers.

I finished the arrangement with yellow rudbeckia with green-cone centers, and Rosa Iceberg.

This iceberg rose did not really bloom well in spring, but recently it has tried again. Its flowers are very small and stems are weak, but I used them today for their fragrance.

Rosa 'Iceberg'

Rosa ‘Iceberg’

Physostegia virginiana (Obedient plant) is starting to bloom this week and I used a couple of stems draping downward.  To complete the arrangement I set the flowers atop an inexpensive bone-colored ceramic novelty vase that is stamped Vintage 4.

In A Vase On Monday--August Mingle

In A Vase On Monday–August Mingle

It is easy to lose track but as I was arranging I tried to work from all sides of the arrangement.

In A Vase On Monday--August Mingle

In A Vase On Monday–August Mingle

In A Vase On Monday--August Mingle

In A Vase On Monday–August Mingle

I do not usually work with so many different flowers in one arrangement and still cannot decide if it is easier or harder. It is surprising that such a variety was available today in my garden.

Materials
Lavandula x intermedia ‘Dutch’ (Dutch Lavender)
Heuchera villosa ‘Big Top Bronze’ (Coral Bells)
Euphorbia ‘Blackbird’ (Spurge)
Tanacetum vulgare (Tansy)
Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue’
Pale yellow and orange Zinnia Cut and Come Again Mix -Burpee- 24” height
Canary yellow Zinnia Giant Flowered -Burpee-30” height  Huge 5” blooms
Echinacea ‘Big Sky Sundown’ (Hybrid Coneflower)
Rosa ‘Iceberg’
Rudbeckia hirta ‘Irish Eyes’
Lantana camara (Common lantana)
Physostegia virginiana (Obedient plant)

In A Vase On Monday--August Mingle

In A Vase On Monday–August Mingle

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting. Discover what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday—Chow-Chow Rustica

Chow-Chow Rustica

Chow-Chow Rustica

Another week is beginning and once again I am joining Cathy’s challenge In A Vase On Monday. The goal is to fill a vase using materials gathered in one’s own garden.

My husband kindly did the photo shoot for today’s arrangement, which afforded him naming rights. Inspired by the container, a simple glass jar that once held Ms. Mary’s Mild Chow Chow, he aptly suggested the title, Rustica.

Rustica also appropriately reflects the simplicity, charm and rural quality evoked by this Monday’s flowers. This is a colorful, informal presentation of yellow, pink and red zinnias supported by yellow rudbeckia with green-cone centers.

Chow-Chow Rustica detail

I planted packets of two types of Burpee Zinnia seeds this year. Both the large yellow and red zinnias in the detail to the left are from the “Giant Flowered” mix. These reach 30 inches tall with blooms of 5 inches in diameter.

Materials
Zinnia Cut and Come Again Mix -Burpee- 24” height
Zinnia Giant Flowered -Burpee-30” height  Huge 5” blooms
Rudbeckia hirta ‘Irish Eyes’

By the way, chow-chow is a colorful relish popular in the South—a tangy, vinegary concoction made of chopped mixed vegetables, sometimes sweet, sometimes hot, sometimes both. I am curious if you are familiar with it and how you use it. There are many variations, but my father enjoyed making chow-chow with his home-grown, coarsely chopped green cabbage, to which he probably added red and green peppers, onions and mustard seeds.

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting. Discover what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday.